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Digital Citizenship

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Digital Citizenship


Performance Indicator-A
a. Advocate and practice safe, legal, and responsible use of information and technology.

 Grades K - 2 Grades 3 - 4 Grades 5 - 8 Grades 9 - 12

Students respect and use technology equipment in a responsible and safe manner. Students recognize the difference between using "local" applications and the Internet. Students identify "personal information" about themselves and recognize the importance of privacy.
Students give credit to content creators.

Students become familiar with school Responsible Use Policies and use resources accordingly. Students demonstrate an understanding of computer security risks and the importance of passwords...Students identify unsafe online behavior (incl. loss of privacy) and the consequences of unsafe behaviors including cyberbullying and harassment. Students recognize what should be reported and to whom.

With teacher guidance, students understand copyright and plagiarism and cite sources in all work.

Students independently adhere to school Responsible Use Policies and use resources accordingly. Students practice responsible computing and protect systems from security risks.
Students identify the short- and long-term consequences of unsafe or inappropriate online behavior and how to protect themselves online. Students exhibit proper etiquette in electronic communication.
Students abide by copyright guidelines and demonstrate fair use in all work, citing sources in appropriate format.

Students adhere to school Responsible Use Policies and use resources accordingly. Students practice responsible computing and protect systems from security risks.

Students identify the short- and long-term consequences of unsafe or inappropriate online behavior and how to protect themselves online. Students exhibit proper etiquette in electronic communication.
Students abide by copyright and demonstrate and advocate for fair use in all work, citing sources in appropriate format.
 
Examples


1. Students are introduced to careful use of hardware and guidelines for school computer use as part of an introduction to their school computer lab.

2. Students share technology resources by taking turns with classroom computers and other equipment (eg. headphones, microphones, cameras, recorders, etc.).

3. When a class visits the Internet, their teacher compares this to visiting a public playground vs. the school playground: less supervision, more "strangers" and unknowns, some dangers if you are not careful.

4. A teacher creates and models a presentation using images or other content from Internet sources, the class discusses content "ownership" (e.g., an author writing a book or an artist painting a painting) and gives credit to information and media sources.
 
Examples


1. Students describe specifics of their school rules for using computers and the Internet including rationale and consequences.

2. Students identify risks that will affect their computer's operation

3. Students use online communication tools and discuss who reads these and the implications of inappropriate posts.

4. Students discuss examples of negative online interaction (eg. harassment, bullying), their outcomes & consequences.
5. Students regularly give credit to creators of information and describe why it is important to do so.

Examples of computer security risks may include: viruses, spyware, adware, keyloggers, and SPAM.
 
Examples


1. Students describe the implications of excessive use of Internet bandwidth, storage, and printer supplies and use these resources responsibly.

2. Students demonstrate basic strategies to avoid viruses and spyware, and how to deal with unwanted communication (pop-ups, web "lures" and spam)

3. Students discuss "dos and don'ts" of electronic communication in terms of privacy and good digital citizenship.

4. As students create multimedia projects using online content (images, audio, etc.) they search for content with creative commons licenses and cite sources appropriately.

Examples of electronic communication tools above may include: email, chat, social networking sites, video conferencing, and texting.
 
Examples


1. Students use social media and multimedia tools to explore and publicize the ramifications of "unsecure" computing, negative online behavior or misuse of copyrighted content.

2. Students help raise awareness of copyright issues among peers, teachers and the broader community by creating informational materials to guide the use of content.

Examples of digital tools above may include: Facebook, Myspace, Twitter, YouTube, etc. Multimedia tools could include online video or audio tools (voicethread, vimio, presi, glogster) or local applications (Powerpoint, Impress, Inspiration, iMovie, Moviemaker, Garageband)

Performance Indicator - B
b. Exhibit a positive attitude toward using technology that supports collaboration, learning, and productivity.

 Grades K - 2Grades 3 - 4  Grades 5 - 8 Grades 9 - 12
 With teacher support, students use digital applications and communication tools productively to accomplish academic tasks and collaborate with peers on group projects.
Students use a variety of digital tools productively to accomplish academic tasks, collaborate with peers and make positive contributions to online communitiesStudents practice proper online etiquette.

Students select appropriate digital tools to accomplish academic tasks efficiently and productively.
Students demonstrate proper online etiquette and recognize social and cultural differences as they collaborate online with peers locally and globally.
 
Students select and justify digital tools to accomplish academic tasks efficiently and productively. Students demonstrate proper online etiquette and recognize social and cultural differences as they collaborate online with peers locally and globally.
 
Examples


1. Students create electronic drawings, slideshows, audio recordings and/or group multimedia projects to illustrate concepts from classroom studies, sharing these with peers.
 
Examples of digital tools above may include: drawing programs, sound and video editing software, slideshow programs and online communication tools such as blogs, wikis, web pages or collaborative tools such as Google Apps
 
Examples


1. Students make positive contributions of writing or other digital products to a class presentation, web page or blogVerbally they give constructive feedback to others.
 
Examples of digital tools above may include: drawing programs, sound and video editing software, slideshow programs and online communication tools such as blogs, wikis, web pages or collaborative tools such as Google Apps
 
Examples


1. Students publish digital works online, contribute to group projects, and give constructive feedback to peers in an online forum (wiki, blog, collaborative document)

Examples of digital tools above may include: drawing programs, sound and video editing software, slideshow programs and online communication tools such as blogs, wikis, web pages or collaborative tools such as Google Apps
 
Examples


1. For a class presentation students choose appropriate digital tools and explain the rationale for their choice (eg. efficiency, quality of product, audience, etc.)

2. While collaborating with peers (locally or globally) of differing cultural backgrounds, students demonstrate sensitivity to others' traditions, values and perspectives.

Examples of digital tools above may include: drawing programs, sound and video editing software, slideshow programs and online communication tools such as blogs, wikis,web pages or collaborative tools such as Google Apps

Performance Indicator - C
c. Demonstrate personal responsibility for lifelong learning.

 Grades K - 2 Grades 3 - 4 Grades 5 - 8 Grades 9 - 12
 With teacher support, students identify how technology allows access to information beyond the classroom. 
Students use technology to access information beyond the classroom. 

Students develop strategies to continue their learning through the use of current and emerging technologies.

Students independently use technology to access information beyond the classroom. 

Students develop strategies to continue their learning through the use of current and emerging technologies, including online communities and learning opportunities.
 Students independently use technology to extend their learning beyond the school environment through the use of current and emerging technologies, including online communities and learning opportunities.
 
Examples


1. With teacher guidance and support, students use a variety of technologies in their classroom (e.g., Internet resources, images, multimedia, and electronic communication).

2. Students analyze the role of technology in their lives by identifying different technologies and their purpose.

3. Students participate in a discussion of the dynamic nature of technology and "how we learn new things."
 
Examples


1. With supervision, students access Internet resources regularly to help answer content-related questions and supplement classroom resources. This may include the development of Internet search strategies.

2. Students share tips, tricks and problem solving strategies with peers as they explore new applications.
 
Examples


1. Students access information and communication tools, sharing their experiences, successes and challenges with peers and teachers.

2. While creating a video game using introductory programming software, students access an online forum specific to that program to find an answer or solution.

Examples of online communities might include forums, social networking sites or video conferencing (Skype).
 
Examples


1. Students access online learning tools in and out of school to explore academic topics.

2. Students are given a new program or tool with which to accomplish a specific task. Students demonstrate self-help strategies (e.g., use of help menus, accessing peers and teachers, online forums, etc.) to learn the tool.


Performance Indicator - D
d. Exhibit leadership for digital citizenship.

Grades K - 2  Grades 3 - 4 Grades 5 - 8 Grades 9 - 12
 Students use digital tools appropriately, assisting peers when possible. Students use digital tools and the Internet appropriately, leading by example and assisting peers when possible. Students actively involve themselves in the exploration and application of new technologies, leading by example and assisting others in the community. Students actively involve themselves in the exploration and application of new technologies, leading by example and assisting others in the local and global community.
 
Examples


1. Students help each other to remember guidelines for appropriate use of technology by contributing their ideas to a class poster about responsible computer and Internet use.

2. Students practice the "Ask three, then me" method of peer support: Making their best effort, then asking peers for assistance before the adults.
 
Examples


1. Student Internet and application use is focused on academic goals.

2. Students self-monitor and support peers in responsible use of technology.

3. Students assist peers with tips and suggestions vs. grabbing the mouse and "driving for them"
 
Examples


1. Students assist in the creation of technology support materials ("How To" guides, posters, PSAs) for peers and younger students.

2. As part of a unit on Medieval Times, students independently review several teacher-selected websites and report to peers on which sites are more useful and why.
 
Examples


1. Students create multimedia presentations to demonstrate or explain the use of new digital tools and post them online.

Examples of digital tools above may include: screencasts, videos, slideshows

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Vision
As the tides of the ocean and the strength of the mountain shape our community, the York Schools' commitment to educational excellence and individual achievement shapes the future of each student. 
Mission
The mission of York Schools is to educate, inspire and challenge all learners to be ethical citizens who will make a difference in a changing and complex world.