Grade 7 VPA

NECAP Standards
Cycle of Review and Revision
K-8 Curriculum Alignment
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Office hours are 8:00 am to 4:00 pm. Monday through Friday, except holidays

Barbara Maling
Director of Curriculum and Instruction

Call Us:
 
207- 363-3403

Grade Seven Visual and Performing Arts
Scope and Sequence


Students will be actively involved in learning experiences focused on:

Art by developing a working knowledge of various studio processes and techniques. Through experimentation with a variety of mediums, students will gain an understanding of both the formal and expressive qualities of art.

Concepts covered include:
  • The Element and Principles of Design
  • Color Theory
  • Symbolism and Self Expression
  • Critique, Self-reflection, and Constructive Criticism
  • Projects include:
  • Cut paper designs
  • Styrogami
  • Linoleum Cut Prints
  • Collaborative Mural (painting)
  • Self portrait and value studies
  • Totem Pole sculptures 
Music-Students in grade 7 are now required to participate in a music class. They have the option of choosing from general music, band, strings or chorus. Participation in 7/8 grade band or strings requires a pre-requisite experience with an instrument.

General Music and/or Performing Ensembles:
  • Overview of all musical style periods, 1400-present.
Theoretical study of music notation including:
  • compound meter
  • study of major scales
  • key signatures
  • Continued keyboard study.
  • Study of beginning composition and music technology software including Garage Band and Finale.
  • Singing and playing music from various cultures and time periods.
  • Solfege


YORK SCHOOL DEPARTMENT
CURRICULUM ALIGNMENT
SUBJECT AREA: VISUAL & PERFORMING ARTS
GRADE: 7     

Visual and Performing Arts
Crosswalk Content Standards
Performance Indicators
Instructional Practice
Assessment Tools
Reporting Tools
A. DISCIPLINARY LITERACY - DANCE: Students show literacy in the discipline through understanding and demonstrating concepts, skills, terminology, and processes.
A.1. Terminology
Students identify and describe the dance terms of time, composition, and style/tradition.
The York School Department curriculum does not include theater at the middle or high school levels. Optional extra-curricular opportunities for students are available.
A.2. Space  
Students apply space concepts in a repeatable movement phrase.

A.3. Time  
Students move to complex rhythm patterns and syncopation.
A.4. Energy   
Students explain and incorporate bound/free, tension/relaxation, indirect/direct movements to show differences in energy qualities.
A.5. Locomotor and Non-locomotor Movement
Students combine and demonstrate the technical skills of skeletal alignment, strength, agility, and coordination.
A.6. Compositional Forms  
Students replicate a dance phrase.
A. DISCIPLINARY LITERACY MUSIC: Students show literacy in the discipline by understanding and demonstrating concepts, skills, terminology, and processes.
A.1. Music Difficulty
Students accurately perform music that includes changes of tempo, key, and meter in modest ranges with moderate technical demands, modeling proper posture and technique, alone or with others.
a. Students perform music written in major and minor using both their voices and keyboards.

b. The music being performed is in both duple, triple and changing meter.

c. Students perform two and three part harmony using their voices and the keyboards.
e. Students conduct in duple, triple and changing meter.
a. Model major and minor scales, arpeggios and chords using solfege.

b. Explain and review appropriate
audience behavior while observing performances.

c. Interpret dynamics into singing and playing while maintaining the tempo.  Dynamics should include, fortissimo, forte, mezzo forte, mezzo piano, piano and pianissimo.

d. Perform solfege exercises from do to do in step wise and skipping motion.
e. Develop movemnets that
demonstrate understanding of rhythm patterns.

f.Examine rhythmic meters including 2/4, 3/4, 4/4 and 6/8.

g. Identify notes on the ledger lines above and below the grand staff.
  • teacher rubrics
  • tests/quizzes
  • projects
  • group work
  • work samples
  • teacher feedback
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • teacher web pages
  • email communication
  • power school
  • student/parent conferences
  • newsletters
  • informational meetings
A.2. Notation and Terminology   Studentsapply accumulated knowledge of musical notation, symbols, and terminology to a music performance.
a. Read whole, half, dotted half, quarter, and eighth notes and rests in 2/4, 3/4, and 4/4 meter signatures.
b.Students perform in 3/8, 6/8, cut and 3/2 time signatures.
c. Students perform 1/8th and 1/16th note rhythms.
d. Students create major and minor tetrachords.
e. Students can recite the order of sharps and flats and construct key signatures.
f. Students can construct major and minor intervals.
a. The following terms will be identified,
  • A cappella
  • Articulation
  • Ballad
  • Ballet
  • Bridge
  • Chord
  • Chromatic
  • Conducting Technique
  • Descant
  • Downbeat
  • Fortissimo
  • Gospel
  • Half Step
  • Archo
  • Interlude
  • Legato
  • Mood
  • Pentatonic
  • Pianissimo
  • Pizzicato
  • Staccato
  • Texture
  • Triad
  • Vivace
  • Whole Step
  • teacher rubrics
  • tests/quizzes
  • projects
  • group work
  • work samples
  • teacher feedback
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • teacher web pages
  • email communication
  • power school
  • student/parent conferences
  • newsletters
  • informational meetings
Identify symbols for terms listed above in section A.
  • teacher rubrics
  • tests/quizzes
  • projects
  • group work
  • work samples
  • teacher feedback
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • teacher web pages
  • email communication
  • power school
  • student/parent conferences
  • newsletters
  • informational meetings
A.3. Listening and Describing  Students listen to and compare qualities/elements of music including pitch, rhythm, tempo, dynamics, form, timbre, texture, harmony, style, and compound meter.
a. Students listen to and describe key components of the major musical style periods.
b. Students create a timeline of all the musical style periods.
c. Students examine the characteristics of African music.
a. Review key components of the given style periods including three prominent composers, instrumentation, and musical forms.  Discuss the influence of other art forms and historical events.
  • teacher rubrics
  • tests/quizzes
  • projects
  • group work
  • work samples
  • teacher feedback
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • teacher web pages
  • email communication
  • power school
  • student/parent conferences
  • newsletters
  • informational meetings
A. DISCIPLINE LITERACY - THEATER: Students show literacy in the art discipline by understanding and demonstrating concepts, skills, terminology, and processes.
A.1. Terminology  
Students identify and explain theater terms and concepts including stage business, ad-libbing, conflict, action/reaction, focus, and stage directions.
The York School Department curriculum does not include theater at the middle or high school levels. Optional extra-curricular opportunities for students are available.
A.2. Production  
Students describe and participate in a performance from pre-show through strike.
A. DISCIPLINARY LITERACY - VISUAL ARTS: Students show literacy in the art discipline by understanding and demonstrating concepts, skills, terminology, and processes.
A.1. Artist's Purpose  
Students explain and compare different purposes of artists and their artwork, in the context of time and place.
A.2. Elements of Art and Principles of Design  
Students compare features of composition both within an art work and among art works.
a. Compare Elements of Art: color, form, line, shape, space, texture, and value.
Define the elements of art.

Identify the elements of art used in historical artwork and in the work of peers.

Discuss how art elements contribute to the mood and/or meaning  of artwork.

Create artwork that emphasizes specific design elements.

Evaluate/critique the effect of design decisions.

Revise/refine work based on feedback from teacher and peers.
  • teacher rubrics
  • tests/quizzes
  • projects
  • group work
  • work samples
  • teacher feedback
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • teacher web pages
  • email communication
  • power school
  • student/parent conferences
  • newsletters
  • informational meetings
b. Compare Principles of Design including balance, contrast, emphasis, movement, pattern, rhythm, and unity.
Define the principles of art.

Identify the principles of art used in historical artwork and in the work of peers.

Discuss how art principles contribute to the mood and/or meaning  of artwork.

Create artwork that emphasizes specific design principles.

Evaluate/critique the effect of design decisions.

Revise/refine work based on feedback.
  • teacher rubrics
  • tests/quizzes
  • projects
  • group work
  • work samples
  • teacher feedback
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • teacher web pages
  • email communication
  • power school
  • student/parent conferences
  • newsletters
  • informational meetings
A.3. Media, Tools, Techniques, and Processes  
Students explain the effects of media and their associated tools, techniques, and processes, using elements, principles, and expressive qualities in art forms and genres.
Identify the use of design elements and principles within works of art.

Discuss/ describe the mood created in various artworks. (based on personal opinion)

Explore the relationship between design elements and emotional response.

Create a work of art that expresses a specific mood, emotion, or idea.
  • teacher rubrics
  • tests/quizzes
  • projects
  • group work
  • work samples
  • teacher feedback
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • teacher web pages
  • email communication
  • power school
  • student/parent conferences
  • newsletters
  • informational meetings
B. CREATION, PERFORMANCE, AND EXPRESSION - DANCE: Students create, perform, and express ideas through the art discipline.
B.1. Communication
Students use movement to express and communicate a story, a piece of music, an artwork, or an emotion.
The York School Department curriculum does not include theater at the middle or high school levels. Optional extra-curricular opportunities for students are available.
B.2. Sequencing  
Students create and develop dance sequences.
B.3. Solving Challenges  
Students use improvisation to discover and invent movement sequences and solve movement challenges with one or more partners.
B.4. Technical Aspects  
Students identify and select light, costume, or sound changes to enhance a dance phrase.
B. CREATION, PERFORMANCE, AND EXPRESSION - MUSIC: Students create, perform, and express through the art discipline.
B.1. Style/Genre
Students perform music of various styles and genres that requires well developed technical skills, attention to phrasing and interpretation and various meters and rhythms in a variety of keys, accurately applying the accumulated knowledge and skills of: proper posture and technique; musical notation; symbols; and terminology.
a. Students create a timeline significant style periods throughout music history.  
a. Discuss key components of all the given style periods including prominant composers, instrumentation and musical forms.  Discuss the influence of other art forms on historical events.

  • teacher rubrics
  • tests/quizzes
  • projects
  • group work
  • work samples
  • teacher feedback
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • teacher web pages
  • email communication
  • power school
  • student/parent conferences
  • newsletters
  • informational meetings
B.2. Composition
Students compare musical ideas expressed in their own compositions or the compositions of others.
a. Students create and perform music in multiple keys using their voices and keyboards.

b. Compositions include quarter notes, half notes, eighth notes, 16th notes and their corresponding rests.

c. Compositions are written in duple and triple meter.

d. notation of compositions is done correctly and clearly on the grand staff and then finalized using Finale notepad.

e. Students compose rhythmic compositions in duple and triple meter using whole, half, quarter, eighth and sixteenth note patterns and their corresponding rests.
B. CREATION, PERFORMANCE, AND EXPRESSION - THEATRE: Students create, perform, and express through the art discipline.
B.1. Movement  
Students apply gesture, movement, and stage business in the portrayal of a role.
The York School Department curriculum does not include theater at the middle or high school levels. Optional extra-curricular opportunities for students are available.
B.2. Character
Students demonstrate development of a character's attitude and point of view by adjusting voice timing and tone/level and using non-verbal techniques.
B.3. Improvisation
Students improvise through theatre games by using blocking, relationships, props, and movement.
B. CREATION, PERFORMANCE, AND EXPRESSION - VISUAL ARTS: Students create, express, and communicate through the art discipline.
B.1. Media Skills  
Students choose suitable media, tools, techniques, and processes to create original art works.
Observe the designed qualities of man-made objects and spaces from varying time periods and cultures.

Experiment with a wide variety of materials/processes/ techniques.

Critique and discuss the effect of various media and techniques in the work of peer and professional work.

Revise/refine work based on feedback.
  • teacher rubrics
  • tests/quizzes
  • projects
  • group work
  • work samples
  • teacher feedback
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • teacher web pages
  • email communication
  • power school
  • student/parent conferences
  • newsletters
  • informational meetings
B.2. Composition Skills  
Students use Elements of Art and Principles of Design to create original art works that demonstrate different styles in paintings, 3D objects, drawings from imagination and real life, and a variety of other media and visual art forms.
Explore the concept of positive and negative space through the creation of 2-D artwork.

Explore repetition, unity, and form through the create of 3-D sculpture.

Explore the concept of line, color , shape, and pattern to express mood in a painting.

Explore the concepts of composition and value in the create of a photo-realistic piece.
  • teacher rubrics
  • tests/quizzes
  • projects
  • group work
  • work samples
  • teacher feedback
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • teacher web pages
  • email communication
  • power school
  • student/parent conferences
  • newsletters
  • informational meetings
B.3. Making Meaning  
Students create art works that communicate an individual point of view.
a. Demonstrate skills in the use of media, tools, techniques, and processes.
Observe  a variety of artwork that shares a similar topic.

Observe discuss and analyze the use of symbolism in art.

Create a work of art that uses symbolism to express specific ideas
  • teacher rubrics
  • tests/quizzes
  • projects
  • group work
  • work samples
  • teacher feedback
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • teacher web pages
  • email communication
  • power school
  • student/parent conferences
  • newsletters
  • informational meetings
b. Demonstrate knowledge of visual art concepts.
c. Communicate a variety of ideas, feelings, and meanings.
B.4. Exhibition   
Students select and prepare art works for display in the classroom, school, or community location, and articulate an artistic justification for their selection.
Assess their own work and the work of peers and select best work for display.

Identify strong examples of peer work based on personal opinion.

Discuss design elements to support personal opinions.

Prepare work for display.
  • teacher rubrics
  • tests/quizzes
  • projects
  • group work
  • work samples
  • teacher feedback
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • teacher web pages
  • email communication
  • power school
  • student/parent conferences
  • newsletters
  • informational meetings
C. CREATIVE PROBLEM-SOLVING: Students approach artistic problem solving using multiple solutions and the creative process.
C.1. Application of Creative Process  
Students describe and apply creative-thinking skills that are part of the creative problem-solving process.
a. Fluency
Respond to the criteria for each assignment through the creation of artwork.

Brainstorm ideas for projects as a group.

Offer feedback and constructive criticism to peers.
  • teacher rubrics
  • tests/quizzes
  • projects
  • group work
  • work samples
  • teacher feedback
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • teacher web pages
  • email communication
  • power school
  • student/parent conferences
  • newsletters
  • informational meetings
b. Flexibility
Plan and create artwork that utilizes the given materials and criteria for the assignment
  • teacher rubrics
  • tests/quizzes
  • projects
  • group work
  • work samples
  • teacher feedback
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • teacher web pages
  • email communication
  • power school
  • student/parent conferences
  • newsletters
  • informational meetings
c. Elaboration
Revise and refine artwork based on teacher and peer feedback.
  • teacher rubrics
  • tests/quizzes
  • projects
  • group work
  • work samples
  • teacher feedback
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • teacher web pages
  • email communication
  • power school
  • student/parent conferences
  • newsletters
  • informational meetings
d. Originality
Observe examples of artwork.

Interpret assignments and brainstorm  ideas for projects.

Create artwork in response to criteria and feedback.

Observe and discuss the work of peers.
  • teacher rubrics
  • tests/quizzes
  • projects
  • group work
  • work samples
  • teacher feedback
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • teacher web pages
  • email communication
  • power school
  • student/parent conferences
  • newsletters
  • informational meetings
e. Analysis
Evaluate self and work of peers.

Discuss and evaluate the creation process.

Propose changes that could be made for improvement.
  • teacher rubrics
  • tests/quizzes
  • projects
  • group work
  • work samples
  • teacher feedback
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • teacher web pages
  • email communication
  • power school
  • student/parent conferences
  • newsletters
  • informational meetings
D. AESTHETICS AND CRITICISM - Students describe analyze, interpret, and evaluate art (dance, music, theater, and visual art).
D.1. Aesthetics and Criticism  Students describe, analyze, interpret, and evaluate art.
a. Compare and analyze art forms by applying grade span appropriate concepts, vocabulary, skills, and processes as referenced in Standard A: Disciplinary Literacy.
Observe examples of a variety of artwork. (peer and professional)

Describe artwork using  a word-bank of appropriate art related vocabulary.

Evaluate artwork based on criteria established for the assignment.
  • teacher rubrics
  • tests/quizzes
  • projects
  • group work
  • work samples
  • teacher feedback
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • teacher web pages
  • email communication
  • power school
  • student/parent conferences
  • newsletters
  • informational meetings
b. Compare the quality and effectiveness of art works using multiple criteria from observations, print and/or non-print resources.
Observe examples of a variety of artwork.

Describe artwork using a word-bank of appropriate art related vocabulary.

Express personal opinions about artwork.

Support personal opinions with observations from artwork.
  • teacher rubrics
  • tests/quizzes
  • projects
  • group work
  • work samples
  • teacher feedback
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • teacher web pages
  • email communication
  • power school
  • student/parent conferences
  • newsletters
  • informational meetings
c. Compare the effectiveness of selected media, techniques, and processes in communicating ideas.
Observe examples of a variety of artwork.

Describe artwork using a word-bank of appropriate art related vocabulary.

Compare and contrast the mood of a variety of artwork.

Analyze and debate the meaning of artwork using design elements to support ideas.
  • teacher rubrics
  • tests/quizzes
  • projects
  • group work
  • work samples
  • teacher feedback
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • teacher web pages
  • email communication
  • power school
  • student/parent conferences
  • newsletters
  • informational meetings
d. Explain and compare different purposes of artists and art work in the context of time and place.
E. VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CONNECTIONS: Students understand the relationship among the arts, history and world culture; and they make connections among the arts and to other disciplines, to  goal setting, and to interpersonal interaction.
E.1. The Arts and History and World Cultures  
Students compare products of the visual/performing arts to understand history and/or world cultures.
Discuss the term culture

Compare and contrast artwork from various cultures/time periods.

Interpret artwork in relationship to cultural/social context.

Discuss cultural influence through a creative piece.
  • teacher rubrics
  • tests/quizzes
  • projects
  • group work
  • work samples
  • teacher feedback
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • teacher web pages
  • email communication
  • power school
  • student/parent conferences
  • newsletters
  • informational meetings
E.2. The Arts and Other DisciplinesStudents explain skills and concepts that are similar across disciplines.
E.3. Goal Setting  
Students set goals related to time management, interpersonal interactions, or skill development that will lead to success in the arts.
E.4. Impact of the Arts on Lifestyle and Career  
Students explain the impact of artistic and career choices on self, others, and the natural and man-made environment.
E.5. Interpersonal Skills  
Students demonstrate positive interpersonal skills and analyze how interpersonal skills affect participation in the arts.
a. Getting along with others.
Create a variety of collaborative works.

Engage in constructive criticism during class activities and during individual work time.

Assist each other in developing ideas for individual projects.
  • teacher rubrics
  • tests/quizzes
  • projects
  • group work
  • work samples
  • teacher feedback
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • teacher web pages
  • email communication
  • power school
  • student/parent conferences
  • newsletters
  • informational meetings
b. Respecting differences.
Define culture.

Discuss how culture influences personal opinion.

Describe artwork and offer feedback using appropriate vocabulary from the word-bank.

Participate in cooperative learning experiences

Refer to Code of Conduct

Refer to Haelth Curriculum
  • teacher rubrics
  • tests/quizzes
  • projects
  • group work
  • work samples
  • teacher feedback
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • teacher web pages
  • email communication
  • power school
  • student/parent conferences
  • newsletters
  • informational meetings
c. Working as a team/ensemble.
Create a variety of collaborative works.

Assist each other in the care and clean up of materials.

Demonstrate creative problem solving in the design and construction of artwork.

Support the efforts of other student offering advice and encouragement where needed.
  • teacher rubrics
  • tests/quizzes
  • projects
  • group work
  • work samples
  • teacher feedback
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • teacher web pages
  • email communication
  • power school
  • student/parent conferences
  • newsletters
  • informational meetings
d. Managing conflict.
Brainstorm a list a behaviors that help prevent conflict in the classroom.

Apply this list of behaviors to their daily activities.

Seek the help of the teacher when conflict can not be resolved.
  • teacher rubrics
  • tests/quizzes
  • projects
  • group work
  • work samples
  • teacher feedback
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • teacher web pages
  • email communication
  • power school
  • student/parent conferences
  • newsletters
  • informational meetings
e. Accepting/Giving/Using constructive feedback.
Participate in oral and written critiques.

Utilize appropriate vocabulary from the word bank when describing work.

Support opinions with visual evidence gathered from the work of art.
  • teacher rubrics
  • tests/quizzes
  • projects
  • group work
  • work samples
  • teacher feedback
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • teacher web pages
  • email communication
  • power school
  • student/parent conferences
  • newsletters
  • informational meetings
f. Accepting responsibility for personal behavior.
Brainstorm a list a behaviors that help prevent conflict in the classroom.

Apply this list of behaviors to their daily activities.

Discuss behavior issues with teacher and brainstorm possible strategies for resolution.

Interpret and apply strategies in class.
  • teacher rubrics
  • tests/quizzes
  • projects
  • group work
  • work samples
  • teacher feedback
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • teacher web pages
  • email communication
  • power school
  • student/parent conferences
  • newsletters
  • informational meetings
g. Demonstrating ethical behavior.
Brainstorm a list a behaviors that help prevent conflict in the classroom.

Apply this list of behaviors to their daily activities.

Discuss behavior issues with teacher and brainstorm possible strategies for resolution.

Interpret and apply strategies in class.
  • teacher rubrics
  • tests/quizzes
  • projects
  • group work
  • work samples
  • teacher feedback
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • teacher web pages
  • email communication
  • power school
  • student/parent conferences
  • newsletters
  • informational meetings
h. Following established rules/etiquette for observing/listening to art.
Participate in written and oral critique.

Describe artwork and offer feedback using appropriate vocabulary from the word-bank.

Demonstrate appropriate behavior when enaged in viewing performances or exhibitions.
  • teacher rubrics
  • tests/quizzes
  • projects
  • group work
  • work samples
  • teacher feedback
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • teacher web pages
  • email communication
  • power school
  • student/parent conferences
  • newsletters
  • informational meetings
i. Demonstrating safe behavior.
Brainstorm a list a behaviors that help prevent conflict in the classroom.

Apply this list of behaviors to their daily activities.

Discuss behavior issues with teacher and brainstorm possible strategies for resolution.

Interpret and apply strategies in class.

Demonstrate safety in using music and art supplies and instruments
  • teacher rubrics
  • tests/quizzes
  • projects
  • group work
  • work samples
  • teacher feedback
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • teacher web pages
  • email communication
  • power school
  • student/parent conferences
  • newsletters
  • informational meetings

469 U.S. Route 1 York, Maine | Phone: 207-363-3403 | Fax: 207-363-5602 | Contact Us 

Vision
As the tides of the ocean and the strength of the mountain shape our community, the York Schools' commitment to educational excellence and individual achievement shapes the future of each student. 
Mission
The mission of York Schools is to educate, inspire and challenge all learners to be ethical citizens who will make a difference in a changing and complex world.