Grade 6 VPA

NECAP Standards
Cycle of Review and Revision
K-8 Curriculum Alignment
YHS Syllabi
Curriculum Brochures
Curriculum Maps
YHS Program of Studies
Maine Learning Results 

Office hours are 8:00 am to 4:00 pm. Monday through Friday, except holidays

Barbara Maling
Director of Curriculum and Instruction

Call Us:
 
207- 363-3403

Grade Six Visual and Performing Arts
Scope and Sequence


Students will be actively involved in learning experiences focused on:

Art 
  • Creative Expression-Creating Art
  • Clay- hollow form
  • Cartooning
  • Abstract painting
  • Stained glass facsimile
  • Lettering/Calligraphy
  • Printmaking
  • Criticism and Aesthetics- Looking at Art
  • Analyze Middle Ages to determine how religious beliefs influence art.
  • Examine expressive quality of written word.
Expand art vocabulary:
  • Art Elements-line, shape, form, color, value, space, texture
  • Principles of Design-balance, contrast, emphasis, movement, pattern, rhythm, unity
  • Illumination manuscript
  • Pose
  • Font 
  • Composition
The Arts History and World Cultures
  • Examine cartooning as political and social commentary
  • Examine abstract art from abstraction to non-objective
  • Study Gothic art forms including architecture, stained glass, and illuminated manu-
  • scripts 

Music

General Music and/or Performing EnsemblesMusic Theory:
  • Note Names in the treble and bass clef
  • Ledger Lines
  • Double and triple time signatures
  • Recognize expressive elements of music: dynamics, tempos, accents, melodic phrasing
  • Form: Binary, Ternary, Rondo, Sonata, 12 bar blues, AABA, Arch Form, Theme and Variations

History and Analysis:
  • Renaissance
  • Baroque
  • Classical
  • Romantic,
  • 20th Century Music
  • African American Music
Performance:
  • Singing and playing music from various cultures and genres
  • Show a beginning level of proficiency on a keyboard instrument
  • Improvisation on a melodic and rhythmic instrument
  • Solfege


YORK SCHOOL DEPARTMENT
CURRICULUM ALIGNMENT
SUBJECT AREA: VISUAL & PERFORMING ARTS 
                     GRADE: 6                   

Visual and Performing Arts
Crosswalk Content Standards
Performance Indicators
Instructional Practice
Assessment Tools
Reporting Tools
A. DISCIPLINARY LITERACY-DANCE: Students show literacy in the discipline through understanding and demonstrating concepts, skills, terminology, and processes.
A.1. Terminology
Students identify and describe the dance terms of time, composition, and style/tradition.
The York School Department curriculum does not include dance or theater at the middle or high school levels. Optional extra-curricular opportunities for students are available.
A.2. Space  
Students apply space concepts in a repeatable movement phrase.

A.3. Time  
Students move to complex rhythm patterns and syncopation.
A.4. Energy   
Students explain and incorporate bound/free, tension/relaxation, indirect/direct movements to shiow differences in energy qualities.
A.5. Locomotor and Non-locomotor Movement
Students combine and demonstrate the technical skills of skeletal alignment, strength, agility, and coordination.
A.6. Compositional Forms  
Students replicate a dance phrase.
A. DISCIPLINARY LITERACY - MUSIC: Students show literacy in the discipline by understanding and demonstrating of concepts, skills, terminology, and processes.
A.1. Music Difficulty  
Students accurately perform music that includes changes of tempo, key, and meter in modest ranges with moderate technical demands, modeling proper posture and technique, alone or with others.
a. students perform music written in simple keys using solfege syllables in stepwise motion using both their voices and keyboards.
b. the music being performed is in duple and triple meter.  
c. Students perform two part harmony on keyboards.
d. students conduct in duple and triple meter.
a. Model major scales, arpeggios and chords using solfege.

b. Interpret melodic ostinatos, partner
songs, rounds, canons, and 2 part songs.

c. Explain and review appropriate audience behavior while observing performances .

d. Interpret dynamics into singing and playing while maintaining the tempo.  Dynamics should include, forte, mezzo forte, mezzo piano and piano.

e. Demonstrate an understanding of legato and staccato.

f. Perform solfege exercises from do to do in step wise movement.

h. Execute creative movements to show form, melodic contour, tempo changes, and dynamic changes.

i. Develop movements that demonstrate understanding of rhythm patterns.

j. Examine rhythmic meters including 2/4, 3/4, 4/4

k. Identify the following song forms:
Ternary
Binary
Round

l.  Identify notes of the grand staff.

m. Identify notes in the ledger lines above and below the treble clef.
  • teacher rubrics
  • tests/quizzes
  • projects
  • group work
  • teacher feedback
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A.2. Notation and Terminology   Studentsapply accumulated knowledge of musical notation, symbols, and terminology to a music performance.
a. Read whole, half, dotted half, quarter, and eighth notes and rests in 2/4, 3/4, and 4/4 meter signatures.
b.Students perform in 3/8, 6/8, cut and 3/2 time signatures.
c. Students perform 1/8th and 1/16th note rhythms.
d. Students create major and minor tetrachords.
e. Students can recite the order of sharps and flats and identify key signatures.
a.  Identify:
Accelerando
Accompaniment
Andante
Arrange
Arrangement
Band
Chorus
Composition
Diminuendo
Ensemble
Genre
Improvisation
Interval
Jazz
Largo
Mezzo Forte
Mezzo Piano
Octave
Presto
Range
Ritardando
Enharmonic
Ledger Line
Major Tetrachord
Minor Tetrachord
Major Scale
  • teacher rubrics
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b. Identify symbols and traditional terms referring to dynamics, tempo, and articulation.
Identify symbols for terms listed above in section A
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 A.3. Listening and Describe  Students listen to and compare elements of music including pitch, rhythm, tempo, dynamics, form, timbre, texture, harmony, style, and compound meter.
a. students listen to and describe key components of the classical, romantic, and 21st century music.
b. Students give a performance of Renaissance music.
c. Students determine rhythm, dynamic changes, form, phriasing and tonality.
a. Discuss key components of the given style periods including three prominent composers, instrumentation, and musicial forms. Discuss the influence of other art forms and historical events.

b. Students are able to accurately describe listening examples using the following vocabulary
major/minor
adagio
allegro
canon
crescendo
decrescendo
harmony
improvisation
timbre
contour
arrangement
diminuendo
genre
improvisation
largo
mezzo forte
mezzo piano
presto
range
ritardando
  • teacher rubrics
  • tests/quizzes
  • projects
  • group work
  • teacher feedback
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • teacher web pages
  • email communication
  • power school
  • student/parent conferences
  • newsletters
  • informational meetings
A. DISCIPLINARY LITERACY - THEATER: Students show literacy in the art discipline by understanding and demonstrating concepts, skills, terminology, and processes.
A.1. Terminology  
Students identify and explain theater terms and concepts including stage business, ad-libbing, conflict, action/reaction, focus, and stage directions.
The York School Department curriculum does not include theater at the middle or high school levels. Optional extra-curricular opportunities for students are available.
A.2. Production  
Students describe and participate in a presentation of a performance from pre-show through strike.
A. DISCIPLINARY LITERACY - VISUAL ARTS: Students show literacy in the art discipline by understanding and demonstrating concepts, skills, terminology, and processes.
A.1. Artist's Purpose  
Students explain and compare different purposes of artists and their artwork, in the context of time and place.
Abstract Art - examine non-objective paintings by Pablo Picasso, Marc Chagall, Juan Miro, Jackson Pollock, Kandinsky, Paul Klee, and comtemporary sculpture by Andy Goldsworthy and Dale Chilhuly.
Middle Ages - explore how Christianity influenced art
Clay Animal Banks - compare Inuit animal art forms to contemporary sculpture. View the 17th century art of Albrect Durer, Rembrant and 20th century photographer William Wegman.
Lettering - view and compare styles of lettering and calligraphy ancient through now
Printmaking - compare ancient processes to contemporary
  • teacher rubrics
  • tests/quizzes
  • projects
  • group work
  • teacher feedback
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • teacher web pages
  • email communication
  • power school
  • student/parent conferences
  • newsletters
  • informational meetings
A.2. Elements of Art and Principles of Design  
Students compare features of composition both within an art work and among art works.
a. Compare Elements of Art: color, form, line, shape, space, texture, and value.
Elements of art vocabulary definitions printed on art room aprons
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b. Compare Principles of Design including balance, contrast, emphasis,  movement, pattern, rhythm, and unity.
Recognize and compare the use of elements and principles in Abstract Art Unit
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  • informational meetings
A.3. Media, Tools, Techniques, and Processes  
Students explain the effects of media and their associated tools, techniques, and processes using elements, principles and expressive qualities in art forms and genres.
Express knowledge through related vocabulary, demonstrations and in-class discussions

Abstract Art Unit - students critique five elements and principles of art observed in their painting in essay form
  • teacher rubrics
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  • group work
  • teacher feedback
  • report cards
  • progress reports
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  • email communication
  • power school
  • student/parent conferences
  • newsletters
  • informational meetings
B. CREATION, PERFORMANCE, AND EXPRESSION - DANCE: Students create, perform, and express ideas through the art discipline.
B.1. Communication
Students use movement to express and communicate a story, a piece of music, an artwork, or an emotion.
The York School Department curriculum does not include theater at the middle or high school levels. Optional extra-curricular opportunities for students are available.
B.2. Sequencing
Students create and develop dance sequences.
B.3. Solving Challenges  
Students use improvisation to discover and invent movement sequences and solve movement challenges with one or more partners.
B.4. Technical Aspects  
Students identify and select light, costume, or sound changes to enhance a dance phrase.
B. CREATION, PERFORMANCE, AND EXPRESSION - MUSIC: Students create, perform and express through the art discipline.
B.1.  Style/Genre  
Students perform music of various styles and genres that includes changes of tempo, key, and meter in modest ranges with moderate technical demands accurately applying the accumulated knowledge and skills of: proper posture and technique; musical notation; symbols; and terminology.
a. students create and perform using their voices and keyboard.
b. music is written in the key of C, F, or G
c. music is limited to a one octave range- do-do.
e. compositions may include quarter notes, eighth notes, whole notes and half notes and their corresponding rests.
f. compositions are in duple meter.
g. notation of compositions are done correctly and clearly in the treble staff.
h. compositions include dynamics and phrasing indications.
k. compositions are completed in ternary form.
l. students make connections between their compositions and the compositions of the composers of the time.
m. students listen to and describe key components of Classical, Romantic and Modern music.






a. Discuss key components of the given style periods including three prominant composers, instrumentation, and musicial forms. Discuss the influence of other art forms and historical events.

b. Students are able to accurately describe listening examples using the following vocabulary
major/minor
adagio
allegro
canon
crescendo
decrescendo
harmony
improvisation
timbre
contour
arrangement
diminuendo
genre
improvisation
largo
mezzo forte
mezzo piano
presto
range
ritardando

  • teacher rubrics
  • tests/quizzes
  • projects
  • group work
  • teacher feedback
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • teacher web pages
  • email communication
  • power school
  • student/parent conferences
  • newsletters
  • informational meetings
B.2. Composition  
Students compare musical ideas expressed in their own compositions or the compositions of others.
a. students create and perform using their voices and pianos.
b. music is written in the key of C
c. music is limited to a one octave range- "do"-"do".
e. compositions may include quarter notes, eighth notes, whole notes and half notes and their corresponding rests.
f. compositions are in duple meter.
g. notation of compositions are done correctly and clearly in the treble staff.
h. compositions include dynamics and phrasing indications.
k. compositions are completed in ternary form.
l. students make connections between their compositions and the compositions of the composers of the time.
m. Students compose rhythmic compositions in duple and triple meter.

Assimilate countour of melody using mountain ranges.

Discuss scale tones and their functions.

Generate simple harmony using I, IV and V chords.
B. CREATION, PERFORMANCE, AND EXPRESSION - THEATER: Students create, perform, and express through the art discipline.
B.1. Movement  
Students apply gesture, movement, and  stage business in the portrayal of a role.
The York School Department curriculum does not include theater at the middle or high school levels. Optional extra-curricular opportunities for students are available.
B.2. Character  
Students demonstrate development of a character's attitude and point of view by adjusting voice timing and tone/level and using non-verbal techniques.
B.3. Improvisation  
Students improvise through theater games by using blocking, relationships, props, and movement.
B. CREATION, PERFORMANCE, AND EXPRESSION - VISUAL ARTS: Students create, express, and communicate through the art discipline.
B.1. Media Skills  
Students choose suitable media, tools, techniques, and processes to create original art works.
Experiment with and apply clay, a wide variety of drawing media, printmaking and painting techniques & processes using related tools
  • teacher rubrics
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  • projects
  • group work
  • teacher feedback
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  • power school
  • student/parent conferences
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  • informational meetings
B.2. Composition Skills  
Students use Elements of Art and Principles of Design to create original art works that demonstrate different styles in paintings, 3D objects, drawings from imagination and real life, and a variety of other media and visual art forms.
Apply elements and principles through:

  • Color, texture, form, balance and proportion in Clay Animal Bank
  • Color, shape, space, unity, proportion in Lettering Unit
  • Line, shape, color, value, pattern, balance, texture, unity, movement, emphasis, in Abstract Art Unit
  • teacher rubrics
  • tests/quizzes
  • projects
  • group work
  • teacher feedback
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • teacher web pages
  • email communication
  • power school
  • student/parent conferences
  • newsletters
  • informational meetings
B.3. Making Meaning  
Students create art works that communicate an individual point of view.
a. Demonstrate skills in the use of media, tools, techniques, and processes.
Illustrated Word exercise - create letters from symbols to represent the word's meaning
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b. Demonstrate knowledge of visual art concepts.
c. Communicate a variety of ideas, feelings, and meanings.
B.4. Exhibition   
Students select and prepare art works for display in the classroom, school, or other community location, and articulate an artistic justification for their selection.
Choose background and mat artwork, title artwork and display
  • teacher rubrics
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C. CREATIVE PROBLEM-SOLVING: Students approach artistic problem solving using multiple solutions and the creative process.
C.1. Application of Creative Process  
Students describe and apply creative-thinking skills that are part of the creative problem-solving process.
a. Fluency
Discuss creative thinking skills and how artists used these skills to invent and interpret the world around them
  • teacher rubrics
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b. Flexibility
Discuss creative thinking skills and how artists used these skills to invent and interpret the world around them
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c. Elaboration
Discuss creative thinking skills and how artists used these skills to invent and interpret the world around them
  • teacher rubrics
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  • projects
  • group work
  • teacher feedback
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d. Originality
Dscuss creative thinking skills and how artists used these skills to invent and interpret the world around them
  • teacher rubrics
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  • projects
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e. Analysis
Discuss creative thinking skills and how artists used these skills to invent and interpret the world around them
  • teacher rubrics
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  • projects
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D. AESTHETICS AND CRITICISM - Students describe, analyze, interpret, and evaluate art (dance, music, theater, and visual arts).
D.1. Aesthetics and Criticism  Students compare and  analyze art forms.
a. Use concepts, vocabulary, skills and processes as referenced in Standard A to compare and analyze art forms
Examine how Christianity & Islam influenced art the Middle Ages

Examine the history of lettering as a form of communication

Examine the difference between fine art, craft and commercial art careers

Compare Non-representational artists and their influences through print media and video resources

Examine the aesthetics of contemporary and Native American animal sculpture

Identify and discuss the context of the arts in functional, decorative, spiritual and historic contexts
  • teacher rubrics
  • tests/quizzes
  • projects
  • group work
  • teacher feedback
  • report cards
  • progress reports
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  • email communication
  • power school
  • student/parent conferences
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  • informational meetings
b. Compare the quality and effectiveness of art works using multiple criteria from observations, print and/or non-print resources.
Examine how Christianity & Islam influenced art the Middle Ages

Examine the history of lettering as a form of communication

Examine the difference between fine art, craft and commercial art careers

Compare Non-representational artists and their influences through print medea and video resources

Compare the aesthetics of contemporary animal sculpture to those of the Native American

Identify and discuss the context of the arts in functional, decorative, spiritual and historic contexts
  • teacher rubrics
  • tests/quizzes
  • projects
  • group work
  • teacher feedback
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • teacher web pages
  • email communication
  • power school
  • student/parent conferences
  • newsletters
  • informational meetings
c. Compare and contrast the effectiveness of selected media, techniques, and processes in communicating ideas.
Examine how Christianity & Islam influenced art the Middle Ages

Examine the history of lettering as a form of communication

Examine the difference between fine art, craft and commercial art careers

Compare Non-representational artists and their influences through print medea and video resources

Compare the aesthetics of contemporary animal sculpture to those of the Native American

Identify and discuss the context of the arts in functional, decorative, spiritual and historic contexts
  • teacher rubrics
  • tests/quizzes
  • projects
  • group work
  • teacher feedback
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • teacher web pages
  • email communication
  • power school
  • student/parent conferences
  • newsletters
  • informational meetings
d. Explain and compare different purposes of artists and art work in the context of time and place.
Examine how Christianity influenced art the Middle Ages

Examine the history of lettering as a form of communication

Examine the difference between fine art, craft and commercial art careers

Compare Non-representational artists and their influences through print medea and video resources

Compare the aesthetics of contemporary sculpture to those of the Native American

Identify and discuss the context of the arts in functional, decorative, spiritual and historic contexts
  • teacher rubrics
  • tests/quizzes
  • projects
  • group work
  • teacher feedback
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • teacher web pages
  • email communication
  • power school
  • student/parent conferences
  • newsletters
  • informational meetings
E. VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CONNECTIONS: Students understand the relationship among the arts, history and world culture; and they make connections among the arts and to other disciplines, to goal setting, and to interpersonal interaction.
E.1. The Arts and History and World Cultures  
Students compare products of the visual/performing arts to understand history and/or world cultures.
Examine and discuss Non-Representational Art and its history

Comare past Native American animal sculpture to contemporary examples

Discuss and compare lettering forms throughout history

Discuss art of the Middle Ages and its relationship to Christianity and Islam
  • teacher rubrics
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  • teacher feedback
  • report cards
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  • email communication
  • power school
  • student/parent conferences
  • newsletters
  • informational meetings
E.2. The Arts and Other DisciplinesStudents explain skills and concepts that are similar across disciplines.
Discuss common Scientific terminology through Animal Sculpture unit in visual arts

Discuss shared elements & principles in music through Abstract Art and Jazz musicians of 1920/30
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  • report cards
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  • power school
  • student/parent conferences
  • newsletters
  • informational meetings
E.3. Goal Setting  
Students make short term and long term goals related to time management, interpersonal interactions, or skill development that will lead to success in the arts.
Personalize goal setting for every individual at start of unit and class.

Review Code of Conduct.

Develop standard rules for art classes grades 5-8
  • teacher rubrics
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  • teacher feedback
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • teacher web pages
  • email communication
  • power school
  • student/parent conferences
  • newsletters
  • informational meetings
E.4. Impact of the Arts on Lifestyle and Career  
Students explain the impact of artistic and career choices on self, others, and the natural and man-made environment.
Explore and examine VPA careers through various media, discussion and research.

Debate & identify the benefit of VPA participation incluing quality of life issues, relaxation, improved fine motor skills & craftmanship, freedom of expression & speech, invention/exploration, life long learning, tradition, culture and history.
  • teacher rubrics
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  • power school
  • student/parent conferences
  • newsletters
  • informational meetings
E.5. Interpersonal Skills  
Students demonstrate positive interpersonal skills and analyze how interpersonal skills affect participation in the arts.
a. Getting along with others.
Develop standard rules for art classes grades 5-8.

Review Code of Conduct.

Participate in cooperative learning experiences.

Refer to Health Curriculum.
  • teacher rubrics
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  • power school
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  • informational meetings
b. Respecting differences.
Develop standard rules for art classes grades 5-8.

Review Code of Conduct.

Participate in cooperative learning experiences.

Refer to Health Curriculum.
  • teacher rubrics
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  • group work
  • teacher feedback
  • report cards
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  • teacher web pages
  • email communication
  • power school
  • student/parent conferences
  • newsletters
  • informational meetings
c. Working as a team/ensemble.
Develop standard rules for art classes grades 5-8.

Review Code of Conduct.

Participate in cooperative learning experiences.

Refer to Health Curriculum
  • teacher rubrics
  • tests/quizzes
  • projects
  • group work
  • teacher feedback
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • teacher web pages
  • email communication
  • power school
  • student/parent conferences
  • newsletters
  • informational meetings
d. Managing conflict.
Develop standard rules for art classes grades 5-8.

Review Code of Conduct.

Participate in cooperative learning experiences.

Refer to Health Curriculum.
  • teacher rubrics
  • tests/quizzes
  • projects
  • group work
  • teacher feedback
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • teacher web pages
  • email communication
  • power school
  • student/parent conferences
  • newsletters
  • informational meetings
e. Accepting/giving/using constructive feedback.
f. Accepting responsibility for personal behavior.
Develop standard rules for art classes grades 5-8.

Review Code of Conduct.

Participate in cooperative learning experiences.

Refer to Health Curriculum.
  • teacher rubrics
  • tests/quizzes
  • projects
  • group work
  • teacher feedback
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • teacher web pages
  • email communication
  • power school
  • student/parent conferences
  • newsletters
  • informational meetings
g. Demonstrating ethical behavior.
Develop standard rules for art classes grades 5-8.

Review Code of Conduct.

Participate in cooperative learning experiences.

Refer to Health Curriculum.
  • teacher rubrics
  • tests/quizzes
  • projects
  • group work
  • teacher feedback
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • teacher web pages
  • email communication
  • power school
  • student/parent conferences
  • newsletters
  • informational meetings
h. Following established rules/etiquette for observing/listening to art.
Develop standard rules for art classes grades 5-8.

Review Code of Conduct.

Participate in cooperative learning experiences.

Practice appropriate audience behavior during performances and exhibitions.

Refer to Health Curriculum
  • teacher rubrics
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  • projects
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  • teacher feedback
  • report cards
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  • power school
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  • informational meetings
i. Demonstrate safe behavior.
Develop standard rules for art classes grades 5-8.

Review Code of Conduct.

Participate in cooperative learning experiences.

Use art and music materials and instruments safely.

Refer to Health Curriculum
  • teacher rubrics
  • tests/quizzes
  • projects
  • group work
  • teacher feedback
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • teacher web pages
  • email communication
  • power school
  • student/parent conferences
  • newsletters
  • informational meetings

469 U.S. Route 1 York, Maine | Phone: 207-363-3403 | Fax: 207-363-5602 | Contact Us 

Vision
As the tides of the ocean and the strength of the mountain shape our community, the York Schools' commitment to educational excellence and individual achievement shapes the future of each student. 
Mission
The mission of York Schools is to educate, inspire and challenge all learners to be ethical citizens who will make a difference in a changing and complex world.