Grade 8 SS

NECAP Standards
Cycle of Review and Revision
K-8 Curriculum Alignment
YHS Syllabi
Curriculum Brochures
Curriculum Maps
YHS Program of Studies
Maine Learning Results 

Office hours are 8:00 am to 4:00 pm. Monday through Friday, except holidays

Barbara Maling
Director of Curriculum and Instruction

Call Us:
 
207- 363-3403

Grade Eight Social Studies
Scope and Sequence

Students will be actively involved in learning experiences focused on:

Term One -American Revolution - 1860
  • Personal connections to American History
  • 9/11 America
  • Revolutionary War
  • US Constitution/Foundations of American Government
  • Nation Building
  • Veterans' studies
  • Civil War & Reconstruction
Term Two- Civil War & Reconstruction
  • Presidents/Notable Americans
  • Westward Expansion/Plains Indians
  • The Industrial Revolution/Turn of the Century
  • Reforming: women's suffrage, education, labor
  • World War I- two weeks
Term Three- 1920's to . . .
  • Roaring 20's & Great Depression-two weeks
  • World War II-two weeks
  • Cold War-one week
  • Civil Rights Movement
  • Vietnam and 60's
  • Independent Learning Project from 1950 - 1990's-student choice & design with teacher approval.

YORK SCHOOL DEPARTMENT
CURRICULUM ALIGNMENT
SUBJECT AREA: SOCIAL STUDIES 
GRADE: 8 


Content Standards

Performance Indicators


Instructional Practice


Assessment Tools

Reporting Tools

A. Applications of Social Studies Processes, Knowledge and Skills: Students apply critical thinking, a research process, and discipline-based processes and knowledge from civics/government, economics, geography, and history in authentic contexts.
A.1. Researching and Developing Positions on Current Social Studies Issues

Students research, select, and present a position on acurrent social studies issue by proposing and revising research questions, and locating and selecting information from multiple and varied sources.
a. Propose and revise research questions related to acurrent social studies issue.

 


Compose History Journal entries on both historical social issues and current social issues:

Use primary and secondary source readings prior to composition of the position journal entry. 

Comparing and contrasting Post 9/11 Patriot Act withAlien & Sedition Act.
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b. Determine the nature and extent of information needed.


Read and analyze a variety of materials including:Eyewitnesses and Others and Readings in American History Volumes  1&2
 

Participate in class discussions to determine the number of sources/criteria needed based on specific topic.

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c. Locate and access relevant information that includes multiple perspectives from varied sources.


Assess the point of view presented in both primary and secondary sources as they relate to sectional differences prior to the Civil War: slavery, states' rights, and/or economies.
 

Debate "Should America celebrate Columbus Day?"
 

Interrogate York Middle School artifact displays - write questions speculating on the uses and origins of various artifacts.
 

Utilize "JACKDAWS" primary source materials to formulate questions and assumptions.
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d. Demonstrate facility with note-taking, organizing information, and creating bibliographies.


Complete: Presidents, First Ladies & Notable Americans research packet.  


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e. Distinguish between primary and secondary sources.


Assess the point of view presented in both primary and secondary sources as they relate to sectional differences prior to the Civil War: slavery, states' rights, and/or economies.
 

Debate "Should America celebrate Columbus Day?"
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f. Evaluate and verify the credibility of the information found in print and non-print sources.


Analyze WWI propaganda at firstworldwar.com.


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g. Use additional sources to resolve contradictory information.


Complete: Presidents, First Ladies & Notable Americans research packet.  


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h. Summarize and interpret information found in varied sources and/or from fieldwork, experiments, and interviews.


Research a topic and create PowerPoint® presentations containing text and images. The presentations are the synthesis of information found and summarized.


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i. Select a clear supportable position.


Compose History Journal entries on both historical social issues and current social issues:

Use primary and secondary source readings prior to composition of the position journal entry.


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j. Present a well-supported position, based on findings that integrate paraphrasing, quotations and citations, to a variety of audiences.


Presentations on a variety of topics to classmates and teacher.


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k. Use appropriate tools, methods, and sources from government, history, geography, economics or related fields.


 


 


 


 


l. Use information ethically and legally.


 


 


 


A.2. Making Decisions Using Social Studies Knowledge and Skills

Students make individual and collaborative decisions on matters related to social studies using relevant information and research and discussion skills.


a. Develop individual and collaborative decisions/plans by contributing equitably to collaborative discussions, seeking and examining alternative ideas, considering the pros and cons, and thoughtfully and respectfully recognizing the contributions of other group members.
Develop a Veteran's Service Learning project.
 


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b. Make a real or simulated decision related to the classroom, school, community, civic organization, Maine, or beyond by applying appropriate and relevant social studies knowledge and skills, including research skills, and other relevant information.


Examine US Supreme Court cases, and write an opinion based on research, classroom discussions, and analysis of the Constitution.


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A.3. Taking Action Using Social Studies Knowledge and Skills

Students select, plan and implement a civic action orservice-learning project based on a school, community, or State asset or need, and analyze the project's effectiveness and civic contribution.
 


Complete Veterans In Our Community unit.

Plan, develop, research, and share information that connects us with the community and provides a civic contribution through a Service Learning Project.


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B. Civics & Government: Students draw on concepts from civics and government to understand political systems, power, authority, governance, civic ideals and practices, and the role of citizens in the community, Maine, the United States, and world.
B.1. Knowledge, Concepts, Themes and Patterns of Civics/Government

Students understand the basic ideals, purposes, principles, structures, and processes of constitutional government in Maine and the United States as well as examples of other forms of government in the world.
a. Explain that the study of government includes thestructures and functions of government and the political and civic activity of citizens.


Assemble a model with manipulative parts to illustrate the structures of local, state and national government.
 

View and discuss School House Rock "I'm Just a Bill".
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b. Analyze examples of democratic ideals andconstitutional principles that include the rule of law, legitimate power, and common good.


Study important US Supreme Court case documents that illustrate:

• Popular sovereignty

• Poll Taxes

• Separation of powers

• Andrew Johnson’s Impeachment Trial

Assemble a model with manipulative parts to illustrate the structures of local, state and national government.
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c. Describe the structures and processes of United States government and government of the State of Maine and how these are framed by the United States Constitution, Maine Constitution, and other primary sources.


Assemble a model with manipulative parts to illustrate the structures of local, state and national government.


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d. Explain the concepts of federalism and checks and balances and the role these concepts play in the governments of the United States and Maine as framed by the United States Constitution, the Maine Constitution and other primary sources.


Assemble a model with manipulative parts to illustrate the structures of local, state and national government.


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e. Compare how laws are made in Maine and at the federal level in the United States.


Compare graphic organizers and charts that demonstrate the process of an idea becoming a law at the state and federal level.


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f. Compare the structures and processes of United States government with examples of other forms of government.


 


 


 


B.2. Rights, Duties, Responsibilities, and Citizen Participation in Government

Students understand constitutional and legal rights, civic duties and responsibilities, and roles of citizens in a constitutional democracy.


a. Explain the constitutional and legal status of "citizen" and provide examples of rights, duties and responsibilities of citizens.


Develop individual positions based on discussion of current events.
 

U.S. following 9/11 re: search and seizure.

Create posters that illustrate the characteristics of effective citizens as part of study of Ch. 6 in Call to Freedom.
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b. Describe how the powers of government are limited to protect individual rights and minority rights as described in the United States Constitution and the Bill of Rights.


Discuss when individual rights end and collective rights begin. For example: the Alien & Sedition Act compared to Patriot Act, Japanese Internment and Post: 9/11 Homeland Security.


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c. Analyze examples of the protection of rights in court cases or examples from current events.


Examine case studies utilizing ACLU or local lawyers as they relate to constitutional  rights


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d. Analyze how people influence government and work for the common good including voting, writing to legislators, performing community service, and engaging in civil disobedience.


Sketch or dramatize the process and roles of governmental and non-governmental influences.  Ex: Campaign or Proposal of Student Created “Law”.

 

Read aloud and discuss children’s book House Mouse, Senate Mouse to illustrate bill passage.
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B.3. Individual, Cultural, International & Global Connections in Civics and Government

Students understand political and civic aspects of unity and diversity in Maine, the United States, and various world cultures including Maine Native Americans.
a. Explain basic constitutional, political, and civic aspects of historical and/or current issues that involve unity and diversity in Maine, the United States, and other nations.


Articulate a position regarding citizenship of the Confederate states re-entering the Union, and the rights of newly freed black men while studying the Reconstruction Era.
 

Discuss the role of the Freedman’s Bureau.
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b. Describe the political structures and civic responsibilities within diverse cultures, including Maine Native Americans, various historical and recent immigrant groups in the United States, and various cultures in the world.
 






C. Economics: Students draw on concepts and processes from economics to understand issues of personal finance and issues of production, distribution, and consumption in the community, Maine, the United States, and world.
C.1. Economic Knowledge, Concepts, Themes, and Patterns

Students understand the principles and processes of personal economics, the influence of economics on personal life and business, and the economic systemsof Maine, the United States, and various regions of the world.


a. Explain that economics is the study of how scarcity requires choices about what, how, for whom, and in what quantity to produce, and about how scarcity relates to market economyentrepreneurship, supply and demand, and personal finance.


Examine: Turn of the Century America, Westward Expansion, railroads, the Bessemer process, Second Industrial Revolution, and discuss how America became an economic world power.

 

Discuss the role of the robber barons (Carnegie, Vanderbilt, Pullman, Rockefeller, Pulitzer, and Hearst) in the Industrial Revolution.

 

Discuss a variety of economic issues including: enterprise, entrepreneurs, corporations, trusts, patents.
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b. Describe the functions of economic institutions and economic processes including financial institutions, businesses, government, taxing and trade.


Describe the functions of U.S. economic institutions including: national banks, Wall Street and the Stock Market.
 

Discuss the impact that congress and other economic conditions had on the economy: Congress's passage of income tax, war's impact on industry and labor, mortgages, and trade restrictions & embargo acts.
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c. Identify factors that contribute to personal spending and savings decisions including work, wages, income, expenses, and budgets as they relate to the study of individual financial choices.


Discuss wages and income as they pertain to labor and unions.


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C.2. Individual, Cultural, International and Global Connections in Economics

Students understand economic aspects of unity and diversity in Maine, the United States and various world cultures, including Maine Native Americans.


a. Describe factors in economic development, and how states, regions, and nations have worked together to promote economic unity and interdependence.


Describe the human and economic costs of WWI and Wilson's proposal for the League of Nations.
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b. Describe the economic aspects of diverse cultures, including Maine Native Americans, various historical and recent immigrant groups in the United States, and various cultures in the world.
 


 


 


D. Geography: Student draw on concepts and processes from geography to understand issues involving people, places, and environments in the community, Maine, the United States, and world.
D.1. Geographic Knowledge, Concepts, Themes, and Patterns

Students understand the geography of the community, Maine, the United States, and various regions of the world, and the geographic influences in life in the past, present and future.
a. Explain that geography includes the study of physical, environmental, and cultural features of the State, nation and various regions of the world to identify consequences of geographic influences and make predictions.


Discuss how the geography of the USA leads to: isolationism, need for railroads/transportation, US acquisition of overseas territory, increased immigration in the 1900’s.
 

Analyze US construction of Panama Canal.
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b. Use the geographic grid and a variety of types of maps to gather geographic information.


Interpret maps of :

Great Migration

Settlements of Texas 1850

Estimated Bison population

Shifting patterns of immigration

Alaska and Hawaii

US advances during WWI

Origins and Production Areas of food crops

Population distribution during various eras of American History
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c. Identify the major regions of the Earth and their major physical features and political boundaries using a variety of geographic tools.


 


 


 


 


d. Describe the impact of change, including technological change, on the physical and cultural environment.


Discussion of Roosevelt’s creation of National Parks. 

Analyze consequences of the railroads on the life of the Plains Indians.
 

Analyze the impacts of African American migration 1910-1930.
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D.2. Individual, Cultural, International & Global Connections in Geography

Students understand geographic aspects of unity and diversity in Maine, the United States, and various world cultures, including Maine Native Americans.


a. Explain geographic features that have impacted unity and diversity in Maine, the United States, and other nations.


 


 


 


 


b. Describe the dynamic relationship between geographic features and various cultures, including the cultures of Maine Native Americans, various historical and recent immigrant groups in the United States, and other cultures in the world.


 


 


 


E. History: Students draw on concepts and processes from history to develop historical perspective and understand issues of continuity and change in the community, Maine, the United States, and world.
E.1. Historical Knowledge, Concepts, Themes, and Patterns

Students understand major eras, major enduring themes, and historic influences in the history of Maine, the United States and various regions of the world.
a. Explain that history includes the study of past human experience based on available evidence from a variety of sources; and explain how history can help one better understand and make informed decisions about the present and future.

 


 


 


 


b. Identify and analyze major historical eras, major enduring themes, turning points, events, consequences, and people in the history if Maine, the United States and various regions of the world.
 


 


 


 


c. Trace and explain the history of democratic idealsand constitutional principles and their importance in the history of the United States and the world.
 


 


 


 


d. Analyze interpretations of historical events that are based on different perspectives, and evidence.


Read and report on self-selected historical fiction book.

Research three primary sources from the books events and prepare Venn Diagram and compare fiction to primary sources.

Compare and contrast Revere's engraving of Boston Massacre with Adams' legal opinions of same event and testimony of the witnesses.

Examine multiple versions of Tecumseh's death.
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E.2. Individual, Cultural, International & Global Connections in History

Students understand historical aspects of unity and diversity in Maine, the United States, and various world cultures, including Maine Native Americans.


a. Explain how both unity and diversity have had important roles in the history of Maine, the United States, and other nations.


Simulate western expansion through the use of Lewis & Clark webquest on Internet.

 
Draw upon stories and historical accounts of such leaders as Sequoyah, Tecumseh, The Prophet & Black Hawk to develop an historical narrative, news report or story of Federal and State Indian policy.

Locate and compare the overland trails west to Santa Fe, Oregon, Salt Lake and California; the train north from Mexico: and the water routes around the horn and by way of Panama to California.

Draw upon pioneer journals, letters and diaries, newspaper advertisements, paintings and literature to develop a diary, reenact events, or illustrate episodes on the trails.

Analyze why various groups undertook hazardous journeys to the west on the basis of primary accounts. What were the hazards encountered? What goals did they hope to achieve?

Compare the dream of a western utopia with the realities of everyday life on the frontier. Drawing upon periodicals, diaries, journals, folklore, music and art and how did the image of the west depicted in popular folklore differ from everyday life?

 Identify Joseph Smith, Brigham Young and explain why Mormons headed west.
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b. Identify and compare a variety of cultures through time, including comparisons of native and immigrant groups in the United States, and eastern and western societies in the world.


 


 


 


 


c. Describe major turning points and events in the history of Maine Native Americans, varioushistorical and recent immigrant groups in Maine, the United States, and other cultures in the world.


 


 


 


469 U.S. Route 1 York, Maine | Phone: 207-363-3403 | Fax: 207-363-5602 | Contact Us 

Vision
As the tides of the ocean and the strength of the mountain shape our community, the York Schools' commitment to educational excellence and individual achievement shapes the future of each student. 
Mission
The mission of York Schools is to educate, inspire and challenge all learners to be ethical citizens who will make a difference in a changing and complex world.