Grade 6 SS

NECAP Standards
Cycle of Review and Revision
K-8 Curriculum Alignment
YHS Syllabi
Curriculum Brochures
Curriculum Maps
YHS Program of Studies
Maine Learning Results 

Office hours are 8:00 am to 4:00 pm. Monday through Friday, except holidays

Barbara Maling
Director of Curriculum and Instruction

Call Us:
 
207- 363-3403

Grade Six Social Studies
Scope and Sequence


Students will be actively involved in learning experiences focused on:
  • Geographic Literacy
  • Understanding maps and globes
  • Physical and man-made features
  • Map making symbols
  • Time skills
  • Sequencing
  • Using and constructing time lines
  • Culture, geography, history and government of the following places:
  • Canada
  • Mexico
  • West Indies
  • South America
  • Latin America
  • Special Units
  • MiMi 2 the Maya
  • Latin American Festival
  • Canada-computer activity
  • Maine-Native Americans Unit 

YORK SCHOOL DEPARTMENT
CURRICULUM ALIGNMENT
SUBJECT AREA: SOCIAL STUDIES
 GRADE: 6 

Content Standards
Performance Indicators

Instructional Practice

Assessment Tools

Reporting Tools

A. Applications of Social Studies Processes, Knowledge and Skills: Students apply critical thinking, a research process, and discipline-based processes and knowledge from civics/government, economics, geography, and history in authentic contexts.
A.1. Researching and Developing Positions on Current Social Studies Issues

Students research, select, and present a position on acurrent social studies issue by proposing and revising research questions, and locating and selecting information from multiple and varied sources.
a. Propose and revise research questions related to acurrent social studies issue.


Analyze the spatial organization of people, places, and the environments of Latin America and Canada utilizing outside readings and discussions.
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b. Determine the nature and extent of information needed.


 


 


 


 


c. Locate and access relevant information that includes multiple perspectives from varied sources.


Locate, read and discuss primary source materials using the Internet.


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d. Demonstrate facility with note-taking, organizing information, and creating bibliographies.


 


 


 


 


e. Distinguish between primary and secondary sources.


 


 


 


 


f. Evaluate and verify the credibility of the information found in print and non-print sources.


 


 


 


 


g. Use additional sources to resolve contradictory information.


 


 


 


 


h. Summarize and interpret information found in varied sources and/or from fieldwork, experiments, and interviews.


 


 


 


 


i. Select a clear supportable position.


 


 


 


 


j. Present a well-supported position, based on findings that integrate paraphrasing, quotations and citations, to a variety of audiences.


 


 


 


 


k. Use appropriate tools, methods, and sources from government, history, geography, economics or related fields.


Construct and analyze graphs, charts, and tables using provided data.


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l. Use information ethically and legally.


 


 


 


A.2. Making Decisions Using Social Studies Knowledge and Skills

Students make individual and collaborative decisions on matters related to social studies using relevant information and research and discussion skills.

a. Develop individual and collaborative decisions/plans by contributing equitably to collaborative discussions, seeking and examining alternative ideas, considering the pros and cons, and thoughtfully and respectfully recognizing the contributions of other group members.
Compare and contrast the social classes in colonial Mexico.
 

Design a Social Pyramid and know the role of each social group in Mexico.
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b. Make a real or simulated decision related to the classroom, school, community, civic organization, Maine, or beyond by applying appropriate and relevant social studies knowledge and skills, including research skills, and other relevant information.


Discuss current events related to local political and civic decisions, and be able to render an opinion on a given topic.


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A.3. Taking Action Using Social Studies Knowledge and Skills

Students select, plan and implement a civic action orservice-learning project based on a school, community, or State asset or need, and analyze the project's effectiveness and civic contribution.


 


 Plan, develop, research, and share information that connects us with the community and provides a civic contribution through a Service Learning Project.


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B. Civics & Government: Students draw on concepts from civics and government to understand political systems, power, authority, governance, civic ideals and practices, and the role of citizens in the community, Maine, the United States, and world.
B.1. Knowledge, Concepts, Themes and Patterns of Civics/Government

Students understand the basic ideals, purposes, principles, structures, and processes of constitutional government in Maine and the United States as well as examples of other forms of government in the world.
a. Explain that the study of government includes thestructures and functions of government and the political and civic activity of citizens.


 


 


 


 


b. Analyze examples of democratic ideals andconstitutional principles that include the rule of law, legitimate power, and common good.


 


 


 


 


c. Describe the structures and processes of United States government and government of the State of Maine and how these are framed by the United States Constitution, Maine Constitution, and other primary sources.


Compare and contrast the 3 branches of the U.S. Government, the Canadian Government and State of Maine government.


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  • Diagram the structure of the 3 branches of US and Canadian Government
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d. Explain the concepts of federalism and checks and balances and the role these concepts play in the governments of the United States and Maine as framed by the United States Constitution, the Maine Constitution and other primary sources.


Describe the roles of each branch of the US and Canadian Federal Systems.


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e. Compare how laws are made in Maine and at the federal level in the United States.


 


 


 


 


f. Compare the structures and processes of United States government with examples of other forms of government.


 


 


 


B.2. Rights, Duties, Responsibilities, and Citizen Participation in Government

Students understand constitutional and legal rights, civicduties and responsibilities, and roles of citizens in a constitutional democracy.


a. Explain the constitutional and legal status of "citizen" and provide examples of rights, duties and responsibilities of citizens.


 


 


 


 


b. Describe how the powers of government are limited to protect individual rights and minority rights as described in the United States Constitution and the Bill of Rights.


 


 


 


 


c. Analyze examples of the protection of rights in court cases or examples from current events.


 


 


 


 


d. Analyze how people influence government and work for the common good including voting, writing to legislators, performing community service, and engaging in civil disobedience.


 


 


 


B.3. Individual, Cultural, International & Global Connections in Civics and Government

Students understand political and civic aspects of unity and diversity in Maine, the United States, and various world cultures including Maine Native Americans.


a. Explain basic constitutional, political, and civic aspects of historical and/or current issues that involve unity and diversity in Maine, the United States, and other nations.


 


 


 


 


b. Describe the political structures and civic responsibilities within diverse cultures, including Maine Native Americans, various historical and recent immigrant groups in the United States, and various cultures in the world.


 


 


 


C. Economics: Students draw on concepts and processes from economics to understand issues of personal finance and issues of production, distribution, and consumption in the community, Maine, the United States, and world.
C.1. Economic Knowledge, Concepts, Themes, and Patterns

Students understand the principles and processes of personal economics, the influence of economics on personal life and business, and the economic systems of Maine, the United States, and various regions of the world.
a. Explain that economics is the study of how scarcity requires choices about what, how, for whom, and in what quantity to produce, and about how scarcity relates to market economyentrepreneurship, supply and demand, and personal finance.


Compare an economy based on one major cash crop to economies that are diversified.


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b. Describe the functions of economic institutions and economic processes including financial institutions, businesses, government, taxing and trade.


Visit local businesses during job shadow to see how they are run.


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  • Panel discussion on the different jobs
  • Write a thank you letter to business
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c. Identify factors that contribute to personal spending and savings decisions including work, wages, income, expenses, and budgets as they relate to the study of individual financial choices.


Compare the basic economic systems in the United States, Latin America and Canada according to who determines what is produced, distributed and consumed.


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C.2. Individual, Cultural, International and Global Connections in Economics

Students understand economic aspects of unity and diversity in Maine, the United States and various world cultures, including Maine Native Americans.


a. Describe factors in economic development, and how states, regions, and nations have worked together to promote economic unity and interdependence.


Discuss the effects of NAFTA on Canada, Latin America, and the USA.


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b. Describe the economic aspects of diverse cultures, including Maine Native Americans, various historical and recent immigrant groups in the United States, and various cultures in the world.


 


 


 


D. Geography: Student draw on concepts and processes from geography to understand issues involving people, places, and environments in the community, Maine, the United States, and world.
D.1. Geographic Knowledge, Concepts, Themes, and Patterns

Students understand the geography of the community, Maine, the United States, and various regions of the world, and the geographic influences in life in the past, present and future.

a. Explain that geography includes the study of physical, environmental, and cultural features of the State, nation and various regions of the world to identify consequences of geographic influences and make predictions.

Recognize and describe the different physical regions in Latin America and Canada and explain how these regions affect populations.
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b. Use the geographic grid and a variety of types of maps to gather geographic information.


 


 


 


 


c. Identify the major regions of the Earth and their major physical features and political boundaries using a variety of geographic tools.


Use political maps to diagram and label the political units and divisions in Canada.


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d. Describe the impact of change, including technological change, on the physical and cultural environment.


 


 


 


D.2. Individual, Cultural, International & Global Connections in Geography

Students understand geographic aspects of unity and diversity in Maine, the United States, and various world cultures, including Maine Native Americans.

a. Explain geographic features that have impacted unity and diversity in Maine, the United States, and other nations.

Formulate reasons why physical regions impact a country, both economically and culturally.  

Study maps and charts showing the special features of a region and what effects they have on a nation.

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b. Describe the dynamic relationship between geographic features and various cultures, including the cultures of Maine Native Americans, various historical and recent immigrant groups in the United States, and other cultures in the world.


Describe how technology affects regions in the Western Hemisphere.

 


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E. History: Students draw on concepts and processes from history to develop historical perspective and understand issues of continuity and change in the community, Maine, the United States, and world.
E.1. Historical Knowledge, Concepts, Themes, and Patterns

Students understand major eras, major enduring themes, and historic influences in the history of Maine, the United States and various regions of the world.

a. Explain that history includes the study of past human experience based on available evidence from a variety of sources; and explain how history can help one better understand and make informed decisions about the present and future.

Describe the characteristics, distribution, and migration of human populations in the Americas after completing a variety of readings on the  Inca, Maya, Aztecs.


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b. Identify and analyze major historical eras, major enduring themes, turning points, events, consequences, and people in the history if Maine, the United States and various regions of the world.


 


 


 


 


c. Trace and explain the history of democratic idealsand constitutional principles and their importance in the history of the United States and the world.


Describe the complex cultural mosaics that represent Latin American and Canadian populations.


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d. Analyze interpretations of historical events that are based on different perspectives, and evidence.


 


 


 


E.2. Individual, Cultural, International & Global Connections in History

Students understand historical aspects of unity and diversity in Maine, the United States, and various world cultures, including Maine Native Americans.


a. Explain how both unity and diversity have had important roles in the history of Maine, the United States, and other nations.


 


 


 


 


b. Identify and compare a variety of cultures through time, including comparisons of native and immigrant groups in the United States, and eastern and western societies in the world.


Compare the First Nations of Canada and Maine and their cultures.


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c. Describe major turning points and events in the history of Maine Native Americans, various historical and recent immigrant groups in Maine, the United States, and other cultures in the world.


Study the effects of European settlements in North America on First Nation cultures.


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469 U.S. Route 1 York, Maine | Phone: 207-363-3403 | Fax: 207-363-5602 | Contact Us 

Vision
As the tides of the ocean and the strength of the mountain shape our community, the York Schools' commitment to educational excellence and individual achievement shapes the future of each student. 
Mission
The mission of York Schools is to educate, inspire and challenge all learners to be ethical citizens who will make a difference in a changing and complex world.