Grade 3 SS

NECAP Standards
Cycle of Review and Revision
K-8 Curriculum Alignment
YHS Syllabi
Curriculum Brochures
Curriculum Maps
YHS Program of Studies
Maine Learning Results 

Office hours are 8:00 am to 4:00 pm. Monday through Friday, except holidays

Barbara Maling
Director of Curriculum and Instruction

Call Us:
 
207- 363-3403

Grade Three Social Studies
Scope and Sequence


Students will be actively involved in learning experiences focused on:
  • Current Events
  • People of Maine
  • Natives of Maine
  • Events in Maine's History
  • Local History
  • Daily Life- comparing today with the past
  • Places in Maine
  • Maps of Maine 
  • Map Skills
  • Demographics and why people settled in different geographical areas of Maine
  • Different Kinds of Communities
  • Industries of Maine
  • Responsive Classroom
  • Town Government
  • Community Services

YORK SCHOOL DEPARTMENT
CURRICULUM ALIGNMENT
SUBJECT AREA: SOCIAL STUDIES
 GRADE: 3

Content Standards
Performance Indicators

Instructional Practice

Assessment Tools

Reporting Tools

A. Applications of Social Studies Processes, Knowledge and Skills: Students apply critical thinking, a research process, and discipline-based processes and knowledge from civics/government, economics, geography, and history in authentic contexts.
A.1. Researching and Developing Positions on Current Social Studies Issues

Students identify and answer research questions related to social studies, by locating and selecting information and presenting findings.
a. Identify research questions related to social studies - seeking multiple perspectives from varied sources.


 


 


 


 


b. Identify key words and concepts related to research questions, making adjustments when necessary.


 


 


 


 


c. Locate and access information by using text features.


 


 


 


 


d. Collect, evaluate and organize for a specific purpose.


 


 


 


 


e. Communicate findings using a variety of print and non-print media.


 


 


 


 


f. Describe plagiarism and demonstrate appropriate citation.


 


 


 


 


g. Distinguish between facts and opinions or interpretations in sources.


 


 


 


A.2. Making Decisions Using Social Studies Knowledge and Skills

Students make individual and collaborative decisions on matters related to social studies using relevant information and research and discussion skills.
a. Contribute equitably to collaborative discussions, examine alternative ideas, and work cooperatively to share ideas, and individually and collaboratively develop a decision or plan.


 


 


 


 


b. Make a real or simulated decision related to the classroom, school, community, or civic organization by applying appropriate and relevant social studies knowledge and skills, including research skills and other relevant information.
 


 


 


A.3. Taking Action Using Social Studies Knowledge and Skills

Students select, plan, and participate in a civic action or service-learning project based on a classroom, school or local community asset or need, and describe evidence of the project's effectiveness and civic contribution.
 


 Plan, develop, research, and share information that connects us with the community and provides a civic contribution through a Service Learning Project.


  • rubrics
  • tests
  • quizzes
  • projects
  • group work
  • work samples
  • portfolios
  • teacher feedback
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • teacher web pages
  • emails
  • student/parent conferences
  • newsletters
  • informational meetings
B. Civics & Government: Students will draw on concepts from civics and government to understand political systems, power, authority, governance, civic ideals and practices, and the role of citizens in the community, Maine, the United States, and world.
B.1. Knowledge, Concepts, Themes and Patterns of Civics/Government

Students understand the basic ideals, purposes, principles, structures, and processes of democratic government in Maine and the United States.
a. Explain that the study of government includes how governments are organized and how citizens participate.


 


 


 


 


b. Explain and provide examples of democratic ideals and constitutional principles to include the rule of law, legitimate power, and common good.
 


 


 


 


c. Explain and give examples of governmental structures including the legislative, executive and judicial branches and the local, State, and national levels of government.


Identify and describe the role of the civic leaders in our town and the State of Maine.

 


  • rubrics
  • tests
  • quizzes
  • projects
  • group work
  • work samples
  • portfolios
  • teacher feedback
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • teacher web pages
  • emails
  • student/parent conferences
  • newsletters
  • informational meetings
 


d. Explain how leaders are elected and how laws are made and implemented.


Identify a system (e.g. classroom, school, local, state), examine how it functions, and recognize their individual role within that system.
  • rubrics
  • tests
  • quizzes
  • projects
  • group work
  • work samples
  • portfolios
  • teacher feedback
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • teacher web pages
  • emails
  • student/parent conferences
  • newsletters
  • informational meetings
 


e. Explain that the structures and processes of government are described in documents, including the Constitutions of Maine and the United States.
 


 


 


B.2. Rights, Duties, Responsibilities, and Citizen Participation in Government

Students understand the basic rights, duties, responsibilities, and roles of citizens in a democracy.


a. Identify the rights, duties, and responsibilities of citizens within the class, school or community.


Participate in the development and utilization of a Classroom Constitution system that describes the individual student rights and responsibilities.


  • rubrics
  • tests
  • quizzes
  • projects
  • group work
  • work samples
  • portfolios
  • teacher feedback
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • teacher web pages
  • emails
  • student/parent conferences
  • newsletters
  • informational meetings
 


b. Identify and describe the United States Constitution and Bill of Rights as documents that establish government and protect the rights of the individual United States citizen.


Participate in the development and utilization of a Classroom Constitution system that describes the individual student rights and responsibilities.


  • rubrics
  • tests
  • quizzes
  • projects
  • group work
  • work samples
  • portfolios
  • teacher feedback
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • teacher web pages
  • emails
  • student/parent conferences
  • newsletters
  • informational meetings
 


c. Provide examples of how people influence government and work for the common good including voting, writing to legislators, performing community service, and engaging in civil disobedience.
 


 


 


B.3. Individual, Cultural, International & Global Connections in Civics and Government

Students understand civic aspects of unity and diversity in the daily life of various cultures in the United States and the world, including Maine Native Americans.
a. Identify examples of unity and diversity in the United States that relate to how laws protect individuals or groups to support the common good.


 


 


 


 


b. Describe civic beliefs and activities in the daily life of diverse cultures, including Maine Native Americans and various cultures in the United States and the world.
 


 


 


C. Economics: Students draw on concepts and processes from economics to understand issues of personal finance and issues of production, distribution, and consumption in the community, Maine, the United States and the world.
C.1. Economic Knowledge, Concepts, Themes, and Patterns

Students understand personal economics and the basis of economies of the community, Maine, the United States and various regions of the world.


a. Explain that economics includes the study of scarcity which leads to economic choices about what goods and services will be produced, how they will be distributed, and for whom they will be produced.


Participate in field trips to the Old York Historical Society and local businesses.
 

Make comparisons between economic scenarios found in books and those in personal lives. 

Identify industries of Maine and examine why they are successful via classroom discussion, Internet research, and classroom activities.
  • rubrics
  • tests
  • quizzes
  • projects
  • group work
  • work samples
  • portfolios
  • teacher feedback 
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • teacher web pages
  • emails
  • student/parent conferences
  • newsletters
  • informational meetings 
 


b. Explain how entrepreneurs and other producers of goods and services help satisfy the wants and needs of consumers in a market economy, locally and nationally, by using natural, human, and capital resources.
 


 


 


 


c. Describe situations in which personal choices are related to the use of financial resources and financial institutions including the use of money, consumption, savings, investment, and banking.
 


 


 


C.2. Individual, Cultural, International & Global Connections in Economics

Students understand economic aspects of unity and diversity in the community, Maine, and regions of the United States and the world including Maine Native American communities.
a. Describe economic similarities and differences within the community, Maine, and the United States.


Relate stories and articles about how the economy influences peoples’ lives.


  • rubrics
  • tests
  • quizzes
  • projects
  • group work
  • work samples
  • portfolios
  • teacher feedback
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • teacher web pages
  • emails
  • student/parent conferences
  • newsletters
  • informational meetings
 


b. Identify economic processes, economic institutions, and economic influences related to Maine Native Americans and various cultures in the United States and the world.
 


 


 


D. Geography: Students draw on concepts and processes from geography to understand issues involving people, places, and environments in the community, Maine, the United States, and world.
D.1. Geographic Knowledge, Concepts, Themes, and Patterns

Students understand the geography of the community, Maine, the United States, and various regions of the world.
a. Explain that geography includes the study of earth's physical features including climate and the distribution of plant, animal, and human life.


 


 


 


 


b. Create visual representations of the world, showing a basic understanding of the geographic grid, including the equator and prime meridian.


Create and use maps that include symbols and legends.
 

Use map skills to complete Daily Oral Geography problem.


  • rubrics
  • tests
  • quizzes
  • projects
  • group work
  • work samples
  • portfolios
  • teacher feedback
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • teacher web pages
  • emails
  • student/parent conferences
  • newsletters
  • informational meetings
 


c. Identify the earth's major geographic features such as continents, oceans, major mountains, and rivers using a variety of geographic tools.


Compare and contrast the earth’s geographic features.

 


  • rubrics
  • tests
  • quizzes
  • projects
  • group work
  • work samples
  • portfolios
  • teacher feedback
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • teacher web pages
  • emails
  • student/parent conferences
  • newsletters
  • informational meetings
 


d. Explain examples of changes in the earth's physical features and the impact on communities and regions.
 


 


 


D.2. Individual, Cultural, International, and Global Connections in Geography

Students understand geographic aspects of unity and diversity in the community, Maine, and regions of the United States and the world, including Maine Native American communities.
a. Identify examples of how geographic features unify communities and regions as well as support diversity.


 


 


 


 


b. Describe impacts of geographic features on the daily life of various cultures, including Maine Native Americans and other cultures in the United States and the world.
 


 


 


E. History: Students will draw on concepts and processes from history to develop historical perspective and understand issues of continuity and change in the community, Maine, the United States, and world.
E.1. Historical Knowledge, Concepts, Themes, and Patterns

Students understand various major eras in the history of the community, Maine, and the United States.


a. Explain that history includes the study of past human experience based on available evidence from a variety of sources.


 


 


 


 


b. Identify various major historical eras, major enduring themes, turning points, events, consequences, persons, and timeframes, in the history of the community, Maine, and the United States.


Work collaboratively to create a timeline including important people and events of Maine. 

Research significant people and report their contributions to local and Maine history. 

Work collaboratively to create a timeline including important people and events of Maine.
  • rubrics
  • tests
  • quizzes
  • projects
  • group work
  • work samples
  • portfolios
  • teacher feedback
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • teacher web pages
  • emails
  • student/parent conferences
  • newsletters
  • informational meetings 
 


c. Trace and explain how the history of democratic principles is preserved in historic symbols, monuments and traditions important in the community, Maine, and the United States.
 


 


 


E.2. Individual, Cultural, International, and Global Connections in History

Students understand historical aspects of unity and diversity in the community, Maine, and the United States, including Maine Native American communities.
a. Describe examples in the history of the United States of diverse and shared values and traditions.
 


 


 


 


b. Describe various cultural traditions and contributions of Maine Native Americans and various historical and recent immigrant groups in the community, Maine, and the United States.
 


 


469 U.S. Route 1 York, Maine | Phone: 207-363-3403 | Fax: 207-363-5602 | Contact Us 

Vision
As the tides of the ocean and the strength of the mountain shape our community, the York Schools' commitment to educational excellence and individual achievement shapes the future of each student. 
Mission
The mission of York Schools is to educate, inspire and challenge all learners to be ethical citizens who will make a difference in a changing and complex world.