Grade 2 SS

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Office hours are 8:00 am to 4:00 pm. Monday through Friday, except holidays

Barbara Maling
Director of Curriculum and Instruction

Call Us:
 
207- 363-3403

Grade Two Social Studies
Scope and Sequence


Students will be actively involved in learning experiences focused on:
  • Local (York) Community
  • Slavery to Civil Rights
  • Japan


YORK SCHOOL DEPARTMENT
CURRICULUM ALIGNMENT
SUBJECT AREA: SOCIAL STUDIES 
GRADE: 2 

Content Standards
Performance Indicators

Instructional Practice

Assessment Tools

Reporting Tools

A. Applications of Social Studies Processes, Knowledge and Skills: Students apply critical thinking, a research process, and discipline-based processes and knowledge from civics/government, economics, geography, and history in authentic contexts.
A.1. Researching and Developing Positions on Current Social Studies Issues

Students identify and investigate research questions related to social studies by locating, organizing, and sharing information.
a. Identify research questions related to social studies.


Identify, research, and report on a key person in the slavery to civil rights unit.


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b. Follow an established procedure for locating sources appropriate to reading level.


Select a “just right” book pertinent to social studies topics.


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c. Locate and collect information for a specific purpose from sources including maps, photographs, charts and graphs.
Recognize similarities and differences between slavery and the civil rights era after listening to multiple stories and viewing websites. 

Identify slave quilt symbols using a variety of sources. 

Practice music from the slavery and civil rights era.
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d. Organize findings.


Organize research gathered for report on a key person in the slavery to civil rights unit.


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e. Share information gathered using oral and visual examples.


Display and share student research findings.


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A.2. Making Decisions Using Social Studies Skills and Knowledge

Students make individual and collaborative decisions on matters related to social studies using research and discussion skills.


a. Share ideas and listen to the ideas of others to reach individual and collaborative decisions and make plans.


Express hopes and dreams related to classroom learning.
 

Develop class rules and create class constitution. 

Employ knowledge of classroom rights and responsibilities to create rules for fictional York business.
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b. Make a real or simulated decision related to the classroom, school, or beyond by applying appropriate and relevant social studies skills, including research skills and relevant information.


Participate in a variety of collaborative classroom decisions through class discussion and voting. 

Discuss, model, and implement conflict resolution practices using the Responsive Classroom model.

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A.3. Taking Action Using Social Studies Knowledge and Skills

Students select and participate in a civic actionor service-learning project based on a classroom or school asset or need, and describe the project's potential civic contribution.
 


Participate in K-2 One Hundredth Day Food Drive to benefit local community members.
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B. Civics & Government: Students will draw on concepts from civics and government to understand political systems, power, authority, governance, civic ideals and practices, and the role of citizens in the community, Maine, the United States, and world.
B.1. Knowledge, Concepts, Themes and Patterns of Civics/Government

Students understand key ideas and processes that characterize democratic government in the community and the United States.


a. Describe and provide examples ofdemocratic ideals.


Identify unifying characteristics of the classroom community. 

Review and discuss the text “We the Kids”. 

Explain what the Constitution is and why it is important for our country. 

Discuss and evaluate pertinent excerpts from the Constitution after reading the book We the People We’re Writing the Constitution by Jean Fritz.
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b. Recognize symbols, monuments, celebrations, and leaders of local, State, and national government.


Discuss and practice the Pledge of Allegiance.  

Read and discuss various articles in Scholastic News pertaining to historical figures and topics.


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c. Identify community workers and volunteers and the roles they play in promoting the common good.


Parent interviews regarding occupational connection to the community.


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B.2. Rights, Duties, Responsibilities, and Citizen Participation in Government

Students understand the concepts of rights, duties, responsibilities, and participation.

a. Describe classroom rights, duties, and responsibilities including how students participate in some classroom decisions and are obliged to follow classroom rules.


Express hopes and dreams related to classroom learning.

 

Develop class rules and create class constitution.

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b. Explain the purpose of school/classroom rules and laws encountered in daily experiences to promote the common good and the peaceful resolution of conflict.


Discuss, model and implement conflict resolution using Responsive Classroompractices.


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B.3. Individual, Cultural, International & Global Connections in Civics and Government

Students understand civic aspects of classroom traditions and decisions, and the traditions of various cultures, including Maine Native Americans.
a. Identify and compare similar and differing interests and opinions related to classroom traditions and decisions.


Students participate in Morning Meeting and have an opportunity to share items and experiences.


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b. Compare traditions that are similar across the nation and traditions that differ in various cultural groups, including Maine Native Americans.


Recognize the role of the emperor and prime minister of Japan.


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C. Economics: Students will draw on concepts and processes from economics to understand issues of personal finance and issues of production, distribution, and consumption in the community, Maine, the United States, and world.
C.1. Economic Knowledge, Concepts, Themes, and Patterns

Students understand the nature or economics as well as key foundation ideas.


a. Describe economics as how people make choices about how to use scarce resources to meet their wants and needs.


Dramatize situations where personal decisions are made about resources or money.


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b. Describe how money is earned and managed in order to buy goods and services and save for the future.


Participate in field trips to local businesses.  

Make comparisons between economic scenarios found in books and those in personal lives.
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C.2. Individual, Cultural, International and Global Connections in Economics

Students understand the influence of economics on individuals and groups in the United States and the world, including Maine Native Americans.

a. Identify examples of how individuals, families, and communities, including Maine Native Americans, are influenced by economic factors.
Relate stories and articles about how the economy influences peoples’ lives.
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b. Describe work and contribution of various groups to the economics of the local community in the past and present.


 


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D. Geography: Student will draw on concepts and processes from geography to understand issues involving people, places, and environments in the community, Maine, the United States, and world.
D.1. Geographic Knowledge, Concepts, Themes, and Patterns

Students understand the nature and basic ideas of geography.


a. Explain that geography is the study of the earth's surface and peoples.


Use geographical terms to describe various geographical land forms. 

Locate Japan, United States and State of Maine on a World Map.

Simulate population density.
 

Examine Japanese videos and describe Japanese people.
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b. Create visual representations of the immediate neighborhood and community.


Use York map to locate major landmarks and student's homes.


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c. Use basic maps and globes to identify local and distant places, and locations, directions (including N, S, E, and W), and basic physical, environmental, and cultural features.


Describe and identify directionality. 

Use geographical terms to describe physical features of the land.
 

Locate Japan, United States and State of Maine on a World Map.
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D.2. Individual, Cultural, International & Global Connections in Geography

Students understand the influence of geography on individuals and groups in the United States and the world, including Maine Native Americans.
a. Identify the impacts of geographic features on individuals, families, and communities including Maine Native Americans, in the United States and various other nations.


Describe how living on the coast impacts communities in southern Maine. (Interdisciplinary science and social studies coastal studies unit.)


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E. History: Students draw on concepts and processes from history to develop historical perspective and understand issues of continuity and change in the community, Maine, the United States, and world.
E.1. Historical Knowledge, Concepts, Themes, and Patterns

Students understand the nature of history as well as key foundation ideas.


a. Describe history as "stories" of the past.


Listen to and discuss a variety of historical stories. 

Participate in classroom history events including read aloud, performances and speakers including the Underground Railway Performance.

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b. Identify a few key figures and events from personal history, and the history of the community, Maine, and the United States, especially those associates with historically based traditions.


Read about and discuss Martin Luther King, US Presidents, and other historical civic leaders using Scholastic News and other resources.


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c. Identify past, present, and future in stories, pictures, poems, songs or videos.


Learn spiritual songs when studying “From Slavery to Civil Rights” unit. 

View and discuss Harriet Tubman video.


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d. Apply terms such as "before" and "after" in sequencing events.


Complete Time Line of Inventions project.


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e. Create a brief historical account about family, the local community, or the nation by using artifacts, photographs, or stories of the past.


Create a "Me Box" to present to class.


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E.2. Individual, Cultural, International and Global Connections in History

Students understand historical aspects of the uniqueness and commonality of individuals and groups, including Maine Native Americans.


a. Explain how individuals, families, and communities, share both common and unique aspects of culture, values and beliefs through stories, traditions, religion, celebrations, or the arts.


Observe and try on kimonos, the traditional dress of Japan. 

Learn to use chopsticks when studying the traditional food of Japan.
 

Create origami house: Traditional Homes. 

Practice calligraphy: Traditional Craft.
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b. Describe traditions of Maine Native Americans and various historical and recent immigrant groups and traditions common to all.


 


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469 U.S. Route 1 York, Maine | Phone: 207-363-3403 | Fax: 207-363-5602 | Contact Us 

Vision
As the tides of the ocean and the strength of the mountain shape our community, the York Schools' commitment to educational excellence and individual achievement shapes the future of each student. 
Mission
The mission of York Schools is to educate, inspire and challenge all learners to be ethical citizens who will make a difference in a changing and complex world.