Grade 8 ELA

NECAP Standards
Cycle of Review and Revision
K-8 Curriculum Alignment
YHS Syllabi
Curriculum Brochures
Curriculum Maps
YHS Program of Studies
Maine Learning Results 

Office hours are 8:00 am to 4:00 pm. Monday through Friday, except holidays

Barbara Maling
Director of Curriculum and Instruction

Call Us:
 
207- 363-3403

Grade Eight ELA
Scope and Sequence

Students will be actively involved in learning experiences focused on:

Reading:
Employ reading strategies.
Analyze understanding of texts through discussion, written reflection, or creative response.
Apply metacognitive comprehension strategies through "think alouds" and conferring.
Use strategies that involve students reading and responding to self-selected books that help them become proficient,
habitual, and critical readers.
Organize information to show understanding among facts, ideas, and events (e.g. representing main/central ideas or details details within text through charting, mapping, paraphrasing, summarizing, comparing/contrasting, or outlining. (NECAP)
Compare and contrast issues in context to contemporary events, and to their personal, social, and cultural context as thy relate to concepts in the novel The Wave.
Demonstrate knowledge of author's style or use of literary elements and devices (i.e. imagery, repetition, flashback, foreshadowing, personification, hyperbole, symbolism or use of punctuation to analyze literary works. (NECAP)
Describe characterization (stereotype, antagonist, protaganist) motivation or interactions, citing thoughts, words, or actions that reveal characters' traits, motiations, or changes over time in the novel Black Storm Comin.
Understand the author's use of the figurative device of dialect as it relates to the novel Black Storm Comin.
Explain how the author's message or theme is supported within the text of Black Storm Comin.
Read independently at home each night for 20 to 30 minutes.
Draw inferences about text, including author's purpose (e.g. to inform, explain, entertain, persuade) or message, or explaining how purpose may affect the interpretation of the text; or using supporting evidence to form or evaluate opinions/judgments and assertions about central ideas that are relevant. (NECAP)
Compare and contrast related texts (e.g., related by subject, theme, point of view, or mode of writing).
Use the writing process and their knowledge of the 6 + 1 Traits of writing to analyze and interpret authorial purpose and point of view in class texts (with instructional emphasis on historical fiction, realistic fiction, poetry, expository/persuasive informational texts, and short stories).
Summarize multiple, related texts and synthesize summaries for generalizations.
Summarize or paraphrase short texts or segments of longer texts; identify and differentiate between key ideas and supporting details.
Apply reading strategy, ‘react and connect’ to construct personal interpretation of texts.
Use pre-reading activities through mini-lessons to help with comprehension and understanding of material.
Demonstrate an understanding of lengthy complex dialogues and how they relate to a story.
Apply understanding of defining features of theme to a variety of exemplars with instructional emphasis on realistic fiction, historical fiction, short stories, poetry, and informational texts (expository and persuasive).
Explore identified themes across multiple genres (e.g., novel, short story, poetry, myth).
Demonstrate ability to use classroom references and resources independently in their reading and ongoing work and products (e.g., dictionary, thesaurus, handbook on style)..
Discuss concept of propaganda in their study of The Wave.
Apply reading strategies (preview, skim, scan) to identify major organizing components (e.g. titles, headings, sub-headings, thesis, topic sentences, captions, charts, tables, graphs, pictures, summaries, abstracts, etc.) to academic and popular non-fiction texts. (Reports, magazines, newspapers, textbooks, biographies, autobiographies, internet websites, public documents and discourse essays, articles, and technical manuals.
Practice relevant reading strategies (e.g., clarify) to accurately define unfamiliar technical terms in informational texts.
Use the various parts of an informational text (index, table of contents, glossary, transitional words, phrases, transitional devices, bold or italicized text, headings, subheadings, graphic organizers, charts, graphs, or illustrations) to locate specific information..
Use available resources to generate relevant reading/research materials for use in creating an original product.
Generate and evaluate the notes taken from course-related reading, listening, and viewing.
Use strategies to unlock meaning knowledge of word structure, including prefixes/suffixes, base words, common roots, or word origins, or context clues, or other resources, such as dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses, or prior knowledge. (NECAP)
Identify synonyms, antonyms, homonyms, homophones, shades of meaning, ro work origins, including words from other languages that have been adopted into our language. (NECAP)

Writing:
Understand and use the writing process through the 6+1 Traits Writing: ideas, organization, voice, word choice, sentence fluency, conventions, and presentation.
Understand and use the writing process.
Practice targeted traits in a variety of modes.
Participate in mini-lessons and practice concept/skills in writing.
Participate in mini-lessons that connect the process of reading and writing.
Make appropriate responses to a variety of writing tasks. (friendly letter vs. formal letter )
Write stories that include major events, develop settings, and deal with problems and solutions that have a clear beginning, middle and end.
Develop presentations that achieve distinct purposes (e.g., to summarize, to narrate, to inform, to explain, to persuade, to describe).
Write pieces that use descriptive language to clarify, enhance, and develop ideas.
Self-monitor growth and development in sentence variety, sentence fluency, and sentence structure (complexity).
Write pieces that use a variety of transitional devices (e.g., phrases, sentences, and paragraphs.)
Collect and synthesize data for research topics from interviews and fieldwork, using note taking and other appropriate strategies.
Use teacher provided model to correctly format bibliography.
Make effective use of school library resources including personnel and on-line catalogs to generate and secure relevant research materials for a given subject.
Demonstrate competency of technology based research skills as evidenced in the quality of final research product or presentation.
Document research sources accurately and adequately in bibliography.
Demonstrate initial understanding of proper attribution.
Make limited but effective use of primary sources when researching topics.
Explain the importance of primary sources in evaluating the validity and reliability of collected information
Explain how to avoid plagiarism through use of proper attribution of paraphrased material.

Speaking:
Respond appropriately with relevant comments, opinions, evaluations, or questions to student, teacher, or guest presenters.
Develop and deliver a well-organized speech, effectively engaging peers and fielding responses.
Apply mode-specific criteria/rubric from 6=1 Traits of Writing to guide production and set standards for oral presentations.
Develop and deliver oral presentations that identify a clear topic and reliably support that topic.
Develop and deliver oral presentations that use language and structures appropriate to audience and purpose.
Develop and deliver oral presentations that achieve distinct purposes (e.g., to summarize, to narrate, to inform, to explain etc.).
Develop and deliver oral presentations that use a variety of strategies of address (e.g., eye contact, hand gestures, voice modulation, changes of rhythm).
Develop and deliver formal and informal speech presentations
Deliver oral presentations that include a variety of sentence structures appropriate to the purpose.
Respond to audience needs when giving a presentation (e.g., clarify and/or illustrate ideas with examples, adjust to levels of engagement, adjust to level of prior knowledge).

Listening:
Listen effectively and respond appropriately with relevant comments, opinions, evaluations, or questions to student, teacher, or guest presentations.
Establish purpose of hearing/viewing specific material and effectively use this knowledge to gain information. (videos, live presentations, audio materials, etc.).
Adjust viewing and listening strategies in order to comprehend materials viewed and heard.
Apply teacher created or student created criteria to assist in listening and evaluation of oral presentations.
Listen effectively and adapt and apply reading strategy, ‘react and connect,’ to assist in interpretation and evaluation of presentations.
YORK SCHOOL DEPARTMENT
CURRICULUM ALIGNMENT

SUBJECT AREA: ELA    GRADE 8
     
Content Standards
Performance Indicators
Instructional Practice
Assessment Tools
Reporting Tools
A. READING: Students read to comprehend, interpret, analyze, evaluate, and appreciate literary and expository texts by using a variety of strategies.  They connect essential ideas, evaluate arguments, and analyze the various perspectives and ideas presented in a variety of literary and expository texts.
A.1. Interconnected Elements: Comprehension, Vocabulary, Alphabetics, Fluency
Students read and make generalizations from texts, within a grade appropriate span of text complexity, by applying their knowledge and strategies of comprehension, vocabulary, alphabetics, and fluency.
a.  Use a range of before, during, and after reading strategies to deepen their understanding of text(s).
Participate in direct and guided instruction of reading strategies: preview, skim, scan, annotate, connect, predict/anticipate, summarize/conclude, question, visualize /evaluate, apply

Understand and apply range of reading strategies to a wide variety of texts including fiction, non-fiction, and poetry. Read independently or in a group setting.

Seek assistance from teachers, students, and others, as well as additional reference texts when attempting to clarify confusing passages.

All-class novel studies: Black Storm Comin' and The Wave
Short stories, informational text, poetry from, but not limited to, Holt text.

Preteach unfamiliar terms and content prior to class.

Literature circles

Textbook, workbook, teacher-generated assignments
  • classroom tests
  • classroom quizzes
  • projects
  • common assessments
  • performances/displays/presentations
  • teacher checklists
  • teacher rubrics
  • large scale assessments: NWEA, MEA
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • student/parent/teacher conferences
  • teacher websites
  • email communication
  • power school
  • community performances/displays
b.  Demonstrate ownership of appropriate vocabulary by effectively using a word in different contexts and for different purpose
Participate in oral, whole-class word work activities.

Complete vocabulary work activities in Holt's Vocabulary DevelopmentalSpelling guides

Mini lessons from Writing Workshop
  • classroom tests
  • classroom quizzes
  • projects
  • common assessments
  • performances/displays/presentations
  • teacher checklists
  • teacher rubrics
  • large scale assessments: NWEA, MEA
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • student/parent/teacher conferences
  • teacher websites
  • email communication
  • power school
  • community performances/displays
c. Determine the meaning of unknown words by using a variety of strategies including the connotative and denotative meaning of words.
Participate in direct and guided instruction of reading strategies.

Demonstrate correct usage of dictionary and thesaurus.

Complete  Holt exercises on conation/ denotation/prefixes and suffixes
  • classroom tests
  • classroom quizzes
  • projects
  • common assessments
  • performances/displays/presentations
  • teacher checklists
  • teacher rubrics
  • large scale assessments: NWEA, MEA
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • student/parent/teacher conferences
  • teacher websites
  • email communication
  • power school
  • community performances/displays
d.  Use knowledge of Greek, Latin, and Anglo-Saxon roots and word parts to maintain fluency and meaning as they read science, social studies, and mathematics texts.
Participate in whole-class, word-work activities focusing on prefixes, suffixes,and root words.

Demonstrate knowledge of prefixes, suffixes, root words, included in Holt Spelling activities.
  • classroom tests
  • classroom quizzes
  • projects
  • common assessments
  • performances/displays/presentations
  • teacher checklists
  • teacher rubrics
  • large scale assessments: NWEA, MEA
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • student/parent/teacher conferences
  • teacher websites
  • email communication
  • power school
  • community performances/displays
e.  Fluently and accurately read text, within a grade appropriate span of text complexity, using appropriate pacing, phrasing, intonation and expression.
Participate in any number of the following activities:
Self-selected materials at appropriate reading level
Student Read-alouds
Student share of self-authored materials
Book talks
Oral participation in class read of drama
  • classroom tests
  • classroom quizzes
  • projects
  • common assessments
  • performances/displays/presentations
  • teacher checklists
  • teacher rubrics
  • large scale assessments: NWEA, MEA
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • student/parent/teacher conferences
  • teacher websites
  • email communication
  • power school
  • community performances/displays
f. Demonstrate comprehension by summarizing, generalizing, drawing conclusions, making judgments, interpreting text, and synthesizing information within and across texts.
Participate in literary studies across a variety of genres in a variety of instructional settings (e.g., directed, self-selected, or group study)
  • classroom tests
  • classroom quizzes
  • projects
  • common assessments
  • performances/displays/presentations
  • teacher checklists
  • teacher rubrics
  • large scale assessments: NWEA, MEA
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • student/parent/teacher conferences
  • teacher websites
  • email communication
  • power school
  • community performances/displays
g. Evaluate the characteristics of various genres of literature and their purposes.
A.2.  Literary Texts
Students read fiction, nonfiction, drama, and poetry, within a grade appropriate span of text complexity, and analyze the characteristics noting how structural features and common literary devices help shape the reader's response.
a.  Analyze the effect of the qualities of a character on the plot and on the resolution of the conflict.
Participate in literary studies across a variety of genres in a variety of instructional settings (e.g., directed, independent or group study).

Reading Strategies: preview, skim, scan, annotate, visualize, clarify, question, predict, react and connect.
Genre studies: distinguish key features of genre.

Instructional emphasis:  realistic fiction, historical fiction, informational texts, short stories, and poetry.
  • classroom tests
  • classroom quizzes
  • projects
  • common assessments
  • performances/displays/presentations
  • teacher checklists
  • teacher rubrics
  • large scale assessments: NWEA, MEA
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • student/parent/teacher conferences
  • teacher websites
  • email communication
  • power school
  • community performances/displays
b. Evaluate the structural elements of the plot, such as subplots, parallel episodes, and climax; the plot's development; and the way in which conflicts are (or are not) addressed and resolved.
Participate in direct and guided instruction about plot structure during literature studies (novels and short stories). Study contains, but is not limited to, exposition of setting, conflict and characters; complications or rising action;climax; falling action; and resolution

Analyze examples for plot structure.

Organize findings into plotline/plot coaster or other graphic organizer

Black Storm Comin'
The Wave,short stories
  • classroom tests
  • classroom quizzes
  • projects
  • common assessments
  • performances/displays/presentations
  • teacher checklists
  • teacher rubrics
  • large scale assessments: NWEA, MEA
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • student/parent/teacher conferences
  • teacher websites
  • email communication
  • power school
  • community performances/displays
c.  Explain how different points of view can affect the overall theme of the work.
Participate in literary studies across a variety of genres in a variety of instructional settings (e.g., guided, self-selected, or group study).

Understand the historical and/or cultural period of a variety of works

Apply reading strategies to assist in constructing personal interpretation.

Incorporate reading strategies: preview, skim, scan, annotate, visualize, clarify, question, predict, react and connect.

Genre studies: distinguishing key features of genre.

Instructional emphasis:  realistic fiction, historical fiction, informational texts, short stories, and poetry.
  • classroom tests
  • classroom quizzes
  • projects
  • common assessments
  • performances/displays/presentations
  • teacher checklists
  • teacher rubrics
  • large scale assessments: NWEA, MEA
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • student/parent/teacher conferences
  • teacher websites
  • email communication
  • power school
  • community performances/displays
d. Analyze the literary devices that define a writer's style and use those elements to interpret the text.
Participate in literary studies across a variety of genres in a variety of instructional settings(e.g.,  guided, self-selected, or group study).

Participate in direct, guided instruction for specific literary terms and rhetorical devices.

Participate in guided analysis of examples to identify these devices.These include, but are not limited to, figurative language, imagery,simile, metaphor, personification, alliteration, foreshadowing, flashback, and symbol
  • classroom tests
  • classroom quizzes
  • projects
  • common assessments
  • performances/displays/presentations
  • teacher checklists
  • teacher rubrics
  • large scale assessments: NWEA, MEA
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • student/parent/teacher conferences
  • teacher websites
  • email communication
  • power school
  • community performances/displays
e. Identify and analyze recurring themes that appear frequently across traditional and contemporary works.
Compare and contrast identifieduniversal themes from literature studies to contemporary experience.

Explore identified themes across multiple genres (e.g., novel, short story, poetry, and myth).

Incorporate Holt exercises on theme where appropriate
  • classroom tests
  • classroom quizzes
  • projects
  • common assessments
  • performances/displays/presentations
  • teacher checklists
  • teacher rubrics
  • large scale assessments: NWEA, MEA
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • student/parent/teacher conferences
  • teacher websites
  • email communication
  • power school
  • community performances/displays
f.  Describe the use of diction, figurative language, repetition, rhyme and tone to convey meaning in poetry.
Participate in guided reading and discussion of a variety of poetry forms.

Apply reading strategies to assist in constructing personal interpretation.

Understand the importance of word choice in creating tone

Select example poems that emphasize figurative language, repetition, rhyme and heightened tone. Source includes, but not limited to, Holt text and relevant exercises

Self-authored  poetry
  • classroom tests
  • classroom quizzes
  • projects
  • common assessments
  • performances/displays/presentations
  • teacher checklists
  • teacher rubrics
  • large scale assessments: NWEA, MEA
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • student/parent/teacher conferences
  • teacher websites
  • email communication
  • power school
  • community performances/displays
A.3. Informational Texts  
Students read multiple informational texts, within a grade appropriate span of text complexity, making decisions about usefulness based on purpose, noting how the text structures affect the information presented.
a.  Create and revise questions that can be answered by using text structures and information found within texts.
Use the reading process to comprehend, reflect, and make a response to a wide variety of informational readings

Compare and contrast reading experiences across a wide variety of texts.

Self-selected reading for information

Reading for research project

Group and individual question formulation for class quizzes
  • classroom tests
  • classroom quizzes
  • projects
  • common assessments
  • performances/displays/presentations
  • teacher checklists
  • teacher rubrics
  • large scale assessments: NWEA, MEA
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • student/parent/teacher conferences
  • teacher websites
  • email communication
  • power school
  • community performances/displays
b.  Analyze differences in the structures and purposes of varied informational materials.
Apply reading strategies: preview, skim, and scan to identify major organizing components
(e.g., titles, headings, sub-headings, thesis, topic sentences, captions, charts, tables, graphs, pictures, summaries, abstracts, etc.) of academic and popular non-fiction texts (e.g., social studies text and magazines)

Identify with exemplars standard organizational patterns

Apply understanding of "Writing Expository Essays" (Write Source 2000, pp. 107 - 114) to analyze two-part essays.

Introduction/leads, significance, point of view, and thesis

Body paragraphs/subtopics and details

Conclusion/summary of findings, implication of findings, restatement of thesis

Presentation/bold or italics, subheadings, footnotes, visuals

Before/After; Problem/Solution; Cause/Effect
  • classroom tests
  • classroom quizzes
  • projects
  • common assessments
  • performances/displays/presentations
  • teacher checklists
  • teacher rubrics
  • large scale assessments: NWEA, MEA
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • student/parent/teacher conferences
  • teacher websites
  • email communication
  • power school
  • community performances/displays
c.  Evaluate the appropriateness of the evidence presented for an author's conclusions and evaluate whether the author adequately supports inferences.
Activate prior knowledge.

Examine author's purpose, tone, and bias.

Examine author's sources if possible
  • classroom tests
  • classroom quizzes
  • projects
  • common assessments
  • performances/displays/presentations
  • teacher checklists
  • teacher rubrics
  • large scale assessments: NWEA, MEA
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • student/parent/teacher conferences
  • teacher websites
  • email communication
  • power school
  • community performances/displays
d.  Draw conclusions about information from multiple texts and support them with evidence from the texts.
Summarize multiple, related texts and synthesize summaries for generalizations.
  • classroom tests
  • classroom quizzes
  • projects
  • common assessments
  • performances/displays/presentations
  • teacher checklists
  • teacher rubrics
  • large scale assessments: NWEA, MEA
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • student/parent/teacher conferences
  • teacher websites
  • email communication
  • power school
  • community performances/displays
e.  Follow multi-step instructions to complete an application or a complex task.
Incorporate exemplars from internet

Utilize career unit in Home Economics

Incorporate existing team-generated, self-evaluation of civic volunteerism.
  • classroom tests
  • classroom quizzes
  • projects
  • common assessments
  • performances/displays/presentations
  • teacher checklists
  • teacher rubrics
  • large scale assessments: NWEA, MEA
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • student/parent/teacher conferences
  • teacher websites
  • email communication
  • power school
  • community performances/displays
A.4. Persuasive Texts  
Students evaluate the information in persuasive texts, within a grade appropriate span of text complexity, noting how the structural features and rhetorical devices affect the information and argument(s) presented in these texts.
a.  Explain how organizational patterns shape an author's argument.
Use the reading process to comprehend, reflect, and make a response to a wide variety of texts and genres.

Compare and contrast their reading experiences across a wide variety of texts.

Self-selected reading for information.

Reading for research project.

Identify through exemplars the function of organizational strategies, main points, emotional appeals, anecdotes, and physical layouts.

Identify purpose of graphics, sidebars, illustrations, etc.

Utilize Holt's unit, "Proposition and Support"

Text to video comparisons
  • classroom tests
  • classroom quizzes
  • projects
  • common assessments
  • performances/displays/presentations
  • teacher checklists
  • teacher rubrics
  • large scale assessments: NWEA, MEA
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • student/parent/teacher conferences
  • teacher websites
  • email communication
  • power school
  • community performances/displays
b.  Analyze the author's perspective, noting instances of bias, stereotyping and generalizations.
Use the writing process and their knowledge of the 6 Traits of Writing to analyze and interpret author's purpose and point of view in class texts ( instructional emphasis on historical fiction, realistic fiction, poetry, expository/persuasive informational texts, and short stories).

Understand the historical and cultural relevance of the text's setting

Compare and contrast related texts (e.g., related by subject, theme, point of view, mode of writing).

All-class novel studies, Black Storm Comin' and The Wave

From the 6 Traits, emphasize word choice, voice, organization
  • classroom tests
  • classroom quizzes
  • projects
  • common assessments
  • performances/displays/presentations
  • teacher checklists
  • teacher rubrics
  • large scale assessments: NWEA, MEA
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • student/parent/teacher conferences
  • teacher websites
  • email communication
  • power school
  • community performances/displays
c.  Explain instances of propaganda and faulty reasoning
Synthesize the concept of propaganda in their study of persuasive model.

Read a variety of multi-cultural text from, but not limited to, Holt text for a variety of perspectives.

Discuss concept of propaganda in their study of The Wave and support materials on the Holocaust
  • classroom tests
  • classroom quizzes
  • projects
  • common assessments
  • performances/displays/presentations
  • teacher checklists
  • teacher rubrics
  • large scale assessments: NWEA, MEA
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • student/parent/teacher conferences
  • teacher websites
  • email communication
  • power school
  • community performances/displays
d.  Evaluate positions presented in text(s)and take a supported stand.
Use the reading process to comprehend, reflect, and make a response to a wide variety of texts and genres.

Compare and contrast reading experiences across a wide variety of texts.

Self-selected reading for enjoyment and information

Reading to support research project

Reading across the curriculum

Debates
  • classroom tests
  • classroom quizzes
  • projects
  • common assessments
  • performances/displays/presentations
  • teacher checklists
  • teacher rubrics
  • large scale assessments: NWEA, MEA
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • student/parent/teacher conferences
  • teacher websites
  • email communication
  • power school
  • community performances/displays
e. Identify purpose and intended audience of a text.
Read and compare and contrast a wide variety of texts with a wide variety of purposes.

Examine through exemplars the vocabulary, main ideas, and tone of a variety of works.
  • classroom tests
  • classroom quizzes
  • projects
  • common assessments
  • performances/displays/presentations
  • teacher checklists
  • teacher rubrics
  • large scale assessments: NWEA, MEA
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • student/parent/teacher conferences
  • teacher websites
  • email communication
  • power school
  • community performances/displays
f. Identify rhetorical devices an author uses to persuade the reader including bandwagon, peer pressure, repetition, testimonial, hyperbole, loaded words, transfer, amplification, and extended metaphor
Read and compare and contrast a wide variety of texts with a wide variety of purposes

Using exemplars, demonstrate the power of vocabulary to persuade.

Examine the historical and cultural biases commonly held.
  • classroom tests
  • classroom quizzes
  • projects
  • common assessments
  • performances/displays/presentations
  • teacher checklists
  • teacher rubrics
  • large scale assessments: NWEA, MEA
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • student/parent/teacher conferences
  • teacher websites
  • email communication
  • power school
  • community performances/displays
B. WRITING:  Students write to express their ideas and emotions, to describe their experiences, to communicate information, and to present or analyze an argument.
B.1. Interconnected Elements
Students use a writing process to communicate for a variety of audiences and purposes.
a.  Determine a purpose for writing.
Initially, participate in very specific guided  writing tasks.

Reflect on and evaluate their written product using descriptive, analytical rubrics from the 6 + 1 Traits of Writing.

Target writing tasks for 6  Traits of Writing: ideas, organization, voice, word choice, sentence fluency, conventions, and presentation.

Editing for focused correction areas

Self, peer, and teacher editing.
  • classroom tests
  • classroom quizzes
  • projects
  • common assessments
  • performances/displays/presentations
  • teacher checklists
  • teacher rubrics
  • large scale assessments: NWEA, MEA
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • student/parent/teacher conferences
  • teacher websites
  • email communication
  • power school
  • community performances/displays
b.  Decide which information is included to achieve the desired purpose.
Initially, participate in guided or independent writing tasks.

Mini writing workshop lessons on paragraph unity.

Use a variety of strategies to gather information such as brainstorming with class or small peer group, webbing, or other graphic
organizers.

Use an organizational tool such as outlining or Venn diagrams.   

Use peer editing to weed out extraneous, irrelevant, information.

Teacher and self editing  focused on cohesiveness.
  • classroom tests
  • classroom quizzes
  • projects
  • common assessments
  • performances/displays/presentations
  • teacher checklists
  • teacher rubrics
  • large scale assessments: NWEA, MEA
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • student/parent/teacher conferences
  • teacher websites
  • email communication
  • power school
  • community performances/displays
c.  Revise drafts to improve focus, effect, and voice incorporating peer response when appropriate.
Understand and apply the 6 + 1 Traits of Writing

Participate in mini-lessons on word choice and sentence fluency for voice.and practice concepts/skills in their writing.

Modeling

Peer and teacher conference

Oral presentation of self-authored product to class with written peer feedback

Self, peer, and teacher evaluation using 6 + 1 Traits of Writing rubrics and scoring guides.

Monitoring of progress through self-reflection and/or portfolio.
  • classroom tests
  • classroom quizzes
  • projects
  • common assessments
  • performances/displays/presentations
  • teacher checklists
  • teacher rubrics
  • large scale assessments: NWEA, MEA
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • student/parent/teacher conferences
  • teacher websites
  • email communication
  • power school
  • community performances/displays
d. Edit for correct grammar, usage, and mechanics.
Demonstrate understanding of writing process by self-editing and seeking peer editing for conventions.

Demonstrate understanding of the 6 + 1 Traits of Writing by editing for trait #6: conventions.

Mini writing workshop lessons in Conventions
  • classroom tests
  • classroom quizzes
  • projects
  • common assessments
  • performances/displays/presentations
  • teacher checklists
  • teacher rubrics
  • large scale assessments: NWEA, MEA
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • student/parent/teacher conferences
  • teacher websites
  • email communication
  • power school
  • community performances/displays
e. Write to achieve a specific purpose.  
Initially, participate in tightly focused, guided writing assignments

Participate in mini writing workshop on primary purposes of writing: to inform, to persuade, to entertain, etc.
  • classroom tests
  • classroom quizzes
  • projects
  • common assessments
  • performances/displays/presentations
  • teacher checklists
  • teacher rubrics
  • large scale assessments: NWEA, MEA
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • student/parent/teacher conferences
  • teacher websites
  • email communication
  • power school
  • community performances/displays
f. Create legible final drafts.
Participate in mini lessons in word processing on MLTI laptop.

Investigate programs for presentations in alternate formats: brochures, power point, flyers, posters, etc
  • classroom tests
  • classroom quizzes
  • projects
  • common assessments
  • performances/displays/presentations
  • teacher checklists
  • teacher rubrics
  • large scale assessments: NWEA, MEA
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • student/parent/teacher conferences
  • teacher websites
  • email communication
  • power school
  • community performances/displays
B.2. Narrative
Students write narratives that convey complex ideas, observations, events, or reflections.
a.  Establish a plot or other narrative structure, point of view, setting, and conflict.
Read a series of tightly-knit short stories containing all the elements of plot(ie. Aesop's fables, Two- Minute Stories,etc)

Delineate from these stories the plot elements

Brainstorm with peers on possible narratives.

Writing workshop mini lessons on chronology and transitional words

Create a plot coaster or outline that clearly delineates all elements of the narrative before beginning to write.

Teacher/ student conferences.

Self and peer editing

Oral presentation of self-authored story with written peer feedback
  • classroom tests
  • classroom quizzes
  • projects
  • common assessments
  • performances/displays/presentations
  • teacher checklists
  • teacher rubrics
  • large scale assessments: NWEA, MEA
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • student/parent/teacher conferences
  • teacher websites
  • email communication
  • power school
  • community performances/displays
b.  Develop characters.
Read and discuss a large variety of narratives, emphasizing character development.

Discuss the motivations of primary characters in short stories.

Mini lessons on how the reader comes to understand characters: through description, through dialogue, through the character's thoughts. through other characters' observations
  • classroom tests
  • classroom quizzes
  • projects
  • common assessments
  • performances/displays/presentations
  • teacher checklists
  • teacher rubrics
  • large scale assessments: NWEA, MEA
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • student/parent/teacher conferences
  • teacher websites
  • email communication
  • power school
  • community performances/displays
c. Use a range of narrative strategies for effect including dialogue and suspense.
Develop and deliver presentations using teacher created and/or student created criteria.

Writing workshop mini lessons on the use of foreshadowing, flashbacks, irony, sensory details

Respond to audience's needs during presentation (e.g., clarify and/or illustrate ideas with examples, adjust to levels of engagement, adjust to level of prior knowledge).

Writing Workshop mini lessons
  • classroom tests
  • classroom quizzes
  • projects
  • common assessments
  • performances/displays/presentations
  • teacher checklists
  • teacher rubrics
  • large scale assessments: NWEA, MEA
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • student/parent/teacher conferences
  • teacher websites
  • email communication
  • power school
  • community performances/displays
d.  Use stylistic devices including figurative language and point of view to clarify, enhance, and develop ideas.
Produce essays and presentations in a variety of modes by using the writing process and the 6 + 1 Traits of Writing (with specific emphasis on the traits of ideas and organization).

Apply mode specific criteria/rubric from 6 + 1 Traits of Writing to guide production and set standards for written products and oral presentations.

Apply and practice 6 + 1 Traits: Ideas and Organization to develop subtopics within longer piece.
  • classroom tests
  • classroom quizzes
  • projects
  • common assessments
  • performances/displays/presentations
  • teacher checklists
  • teacher rubrics
  • large scale assessments: NWEA, MEA
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • student/parent/teacher conferences
  • teacher websites
  • email communication
  • power school
  • community performances/displays
B.3. Argument/Analysis
Students write academic essays that state a clear position, supporting the position with relevant evidence.
a.  Summarize and paraphrase and/or explain information from reading, listening, or viewing.
Summarize short texts or segments of longer texts; identify and differentiate between key ideas and supporting details.

Writing workshop on the differences between summary and paraphrase.

Use of summary assignments from other content areas( social studies, science, art)

Present pertinent information through oral and/or written projects using citations.

Short stories: Venn Diagram

Novel chapters: Journals

Research materials: Paraphrase and synthesize

Book talks
  • classroom tests
  • classroom quizzes
  • projects
  • common assessments
  • performances/displays/presentations
  • teacher checklists
  • teacher rubrics
  • large scale assessments: NWEA, MEA
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • student/parent/teacher conferences
  • teacher websites
  • email communication
  • power school
  • community performances/displays
b.  Write essays that support an idea and build a logical argument excluding extraneous information and differentiating between facts and opinions.
Produce essays and presentations in a variety of modes by using the writing process and the 6 + 1 Traits of Writing.

Apply mode-specific criteria/rubric from 6 + 1 Traits of Writing to guide production and set standards for written products and oral presentations.

Initially produce an eight-sentence paragraph that takes a stand, is supported by a minimum of three reasons or facts with a supporting sentence for each, and a recapping, concluding sentence.

Expand this basic paragraph into a five-paragraph essay.

Brainstorm pertinent topics as a class.

Brainstorm reasons for opposing viewpoints.

Incorporate past practice MEA's

Adapt and modify written product for oral presentation.
Compose a persuasive essay or editorial speech.

Expository essay to speech or presentation.

Character sketch to interview.
  • classroom tests
  • classroom quizzes
  • projects
  • common assessments
  • performances/displays/presentations
  • teacher checklists
  • teacher rubrics
  • large scale assessments: NWEA, MEA
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • student/parent/teacher conferences
  • teacher websites
  • email communication
  • power school
  • community performances/displays
B.4. Persuasive
Students write persuasive essays addressed to a specific audience for a particular purpose.
a.  Employ a variety of persuasive techniques, including presenting alternate views objectively or addressing potential counterclaims in an essay that supports an idea using facts, supported inferences, and/or opinions appropriate to the audience and purpose and is intended to influence the opinions, beliefs, or positions of others.
Produce and share essays and presentations in a variety of modes by using the writing process and the 6 Traits of Writing.

Apply mode-specific criteria/rubric from 6 Traits of Writing to guide production and set standards for written products and oral presentations.

Letters, editorials, Literary essays, debate speeches, expository essays/presentations
  • classroom tests
  • classroom quizzes
  • projects
  • common assessments
  • performances/displays/presentations
  • teacher checklists
  • teacher rubrics
  • large scale assessments: NWEA, MEA
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • student/parent/teacher conferences
  • teacher websites
  • email communication
  • power school
  • community performances/displays
B.5. Practical Application  
Students write simple business letters and documents related to career development.
a.  Write information purposefully and succinctly to meet the needs of the audience.
Develop and deliver presentations using teacher created and/or student created criteria.

Respond to audiences needs during presentation (e.g., clarify and/or illustrate ideas with examples, adjust to levels of engagement, adjust to level of prior knowledge).
  • classroom tests
  • classroom quizzes
  • projects
  • common assessments
  • performances/displays/presentations
  • teacher checklists
  • teacher rubrics
  • large scale assessments: NWEA, MEA
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • student/parent/teacher conferences
  • teacher websites
  • email communication
  • power school
  • community performances/displays
b. Write to convey specific requests for detailed information.
Develop and deliver presentations using teacher created and/or student created criteria.

Respond to audiences needs during presentation (e.g., clarify and/or illustrate ideas with examples, adjust to levels of engagement, adjust to level of prior knowledge).
  • classroom tests
  • classroom quizzes
  • projects
  • common assessments
  • performances/displays/presentations
  • teacher checklists
  • teacher rubrics
  • large scale assessments: NWEA, MEA
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • student/parent/teacher conferences
  • teacher websites
  • email communication
  • power school
  • community performances/displays
c.  Follow a conventional format for writing resumes, memoranda, and/or proposals.
Develop and deliver presentations using teacher created and/or student created criteria.

Respond to audiences needs during presentation (e.g., clarify and/or illustrate ideas with examples, adjust to levels of engagement, adjust to level of prior knowledge).
  • classroom tests
  • classroom quizzes
  • projects
  • common assessments
  • performances/displays/presentations
  • teacher checklists
  • teacher rubrics
  • large scale assessments: NWEA, MEA
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • student/parent/teacher conferences
  • teacher websites
  • email communication
  • power school
  • community performances/displays
d.  Write multi-step directions, with annotation where appropriate, for completing a task.
Develop and deliver presentations using teacher created and/or student created criteria.

Respond to audiences needs during presentation (e.g., clarify and/or illustrate ideas with examples, adjust to levels of engagement, adjust to level of prior knowledge).
  • classroom tests
  • classroom quizzes
  • projects
  • common assessments
  • performances/displays/presentations
  • teacher checklists
  • teacher rubrics
  • large scale assessments: NWEA, MEA
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • student/parent/teacher conferences
  • teacher websites
  • email communication
  • power school
  • community performances/displays
C. RESEARCH:  Students engage in inquiry by developing research questions, accessing and verifying a variety of sources, communicating findings, and applying the conventions of documentation.  Students present findings orally, in writing, or using mixed media.
C.1. Research  
Students propose and revise research questions, collect information from a wide variety of primary and/or secondary sources, and follow the conventions of documentation to communicate findings.
a.  Determine the nature and extent of information needed.
Sort collected data for effective organization, using a variety of means including, but not limited to: outline, Venn diagram, flow chart, etc.
  • classroom tests
  • classroom quizzes
  • projects
  • common assessments
  • performances/displays/presentations
  • teacher checklists
  • teacher rubrics
  • large scale assessments: NWEA, MEA
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • student/parent/teacher conferences
  • teacher websites
  • email communication
  • power school
  • community performances/displays
b.  Locate and access relevant information.
Make effective use of school library resources including personnel and on-line catalogs to generate and secure relevant research materials for a given subject.

Demonstrate ability to gather relevant research materials through production of verifiable bibliography.

Demonstrate competency of technology based research skills as evidenced in the quality of final research product or presentation.

Document research sources accurately and adequately in bibliography.
  • classroom tests
  • classroom quizzes
  • projects
  • common assessments
  • performances/displays/presentations
  • teacher checklists
  • teacher rubrics
  • large scale assessments: NWEA, MEA
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • student/parent/teacher conferences
  • teacher websites
  • email communication
  • power school
  • community performances/displays
c.  Demonstrate facility with note-taking, organizing information, and creating bibliographies.
Sort collected data for effective organization, using a variety of means including, but not limited to: outline, Venn diagram, flow chart, etc.

Use ready-made or original graphic organizers to record and sort data collected for use in research project.

Use teacher provided model (e.g.,Write Source 2000 Handbook) to produce correctly formatted bibliography.
  • classroom tests
  • classroom quizzes
  • projects
  • common assessments
  • performances/displays/presentations
  • teacher checklists
  • teacher rubrics
  • large scale assessments: NWEA, MEA
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • student/parent/teacher conferences
  • teacher websites
  • email communication
  • power school
  • community performances/displays
d.  Distinguish between primary and secondary sources.
Investigate the use of journals/interviews, etc. Create from a personal veteran  interview a newspaper article that is interspersed with secondary background information
  • classroom tests
  • classroom quizzes
  • projects
  • common assessments
  • performances/displays/presentations
  • teacher checklists
  • teacher rubrics
  • large scale assessments: NWEA, MEA
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • student/parent/teacher conferences
  • teacher websites
  • email communication
  • power school
  • community performances/displays
e.  Evaluate and verify the credibility of the information found in print and non-print sources.
Define and understand the concept of plagiarism.

Explain how to avoid plagiarism through use of proper attribution of cites or paraphrased material.

Write Source 2000, pp 229 - 232
  • classroom tests
  • classroom quizzes
  • projects
  • common assessments
  • performances/displays/presentations
  • teacher checklists
  • teacher rubrics
  • large scale assessments: NWEA, MEA
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • student/parent/teacher conferences
  • teacher websites
  • email communication
  • power school
  • community performances/displays
f.  Use additional sources to resolve contradictory information
Search out a variety of resources utilizing both printed and electronic
sources.
  • classroom tests
  • classroom quizzes
  • projects
  • common assessments
  • performances/displays/presentations
  • teacher checklists
  • teacher rubrics
  • large scale assessments: NWEA, MEA
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • student/parent/teacher conferences
  • teacher websites
  • email communication
  • power school
  • community performances/displays
g.  Summarize and interpret information presented in varied sources, and/or from fieldwork, experiments, and interviews.
Sort collected data for effective organization, using a variety of means including, but not limited to: outline, Venn diagram, flow chart, etc.
  • classroom tests
  • classroom quizzes
  • projects
  • common assessments
  • performances/displays/presentations
  • teacher checklists
  • teacher rubrics
  • large scale assessments: NWEA, MEA
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • student/parent/teacher conferences
  • teacher websites
  • email communication
  • power school
  • community performances/displays
h.  Present findings by paraphrasing, quoting sources, and using proper citation.
Writing workshop mini lessons on proper citation and paraphrasing
  • classroom tests
  • classroom quizzes
  • projects
  • common assessments
  • performances/displays/presentations
  • teacher checklists
  • teacher rubrics
  • large scale assessments: NWEA, MEA
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • student/parent/teacher conferences
  • teacher websites
  • email communication
  • power school
  • community performances/displays
i.  Use information ethically and legally.
Use teacher provided model (e.g.,Write Source 2000 Handbook) to produce correctly formatted bibliography.

Define and understand the concept of plagiarism.

Explain how to avoid plagiarism through use of proper attribution of cites or paraphrased material.

Write Source 2000 pgs. 229 - 232
  • classroom tests
  • classroom quizzes
  • projects
  • common assessments
  • performances/displays/presentations
  • teacher checklists
  • teacher rubrics
  • large scale assessments: NWEA, MEA
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • student/parent/teacher conferences
  • teacher websites
  • email communication
  • power school
  • community performances/displays
D.  LANGUAGE: Students write and speak using the conventions of Standard American English.  They apply knowledge of grammar and usage when reading to aid comprehension.  They know and apply rules of mechanics and spelling to enhance the effectiveness and clarity of communication.
D.1. Grammar and Usage  
Students manipulate the parts of speech effectively and employ a variety of sentence structures to communicate.
a.  Use forms of nouns, pronouns, verbs, adjectives and their modifiers, adverbs, prepositions, transitions, conjunctions and interjections correctly.
Demonstrate understanding of writing process by self-editing and seeking peer editing for conventions.

Demonstrate mastery of fluency and conventions of the 6- Trait program

Apply mode specific criteria/rubric from 6 + 1 Traits of Writing to guide production and set standards for written products and oral presentations.

Rubrics
  • classroom tests
  • classroom quizzes
  • projects
  • common assessments
  • performances/displays/presentations
  • teacher checklists
  • teacher rubrics
  • large scale assessments: NWEA, MEA
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • student/parent/teacher conferences
  • teacher websites
  • email communication
  • power school
  • community performances/displays
b.  Use compound complex sentences.
Demonstrate understanding of writing process by self-editing and seeking peer editing for conventions.

Demonstrate understanding of the 6 + 1 Traits of Writing by editing for trait #6: conventions.
  • classroom tests
  • classroom quizzes
  • projects
  • common assessments
  • performances/displays/presentations
  • teacher checklists
  • teacher rubrics
  • large scale assessments: NWEA, MEA
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • student/parent/teacher conferences
  • teacher websites
  • email communication
  • power school
  • community performances/displays
c.  Use active and passive voices effectively
Writing Workshop mini lessons
Guided or self-selected writing assignment
  • classroom tests
  • classroom quizzes
  • projects
  • common assessments
  • performances/displays/presentations
  • teacher checklists
  • teacher rubrics
  • large scale assessments: NWEA, MEA
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • student/parent/teacher conferences
  • teacher websites
  • email communication
  • power school
  • community performances/displays
D.2.  Mechanics  
Students apply the rules of capitalization, punctuation, and spelling to communicate effectively.
a.  Use correct capitalization and punctuation including commas and semicolons.
Demonstrate understanding of writing process by self-editing and seeking peer editing for conventions.

Demonstrate understanding of the 6 + 1 Traits of Writing by editing for trait #6: conventions.
  • classroom tests
  • classroom quizzes
  • projects
  • common assessments
  • performances/displays/presentations
  • teacher checklists
  • teacher rubrics
  • large scale assessments: NWEA, MEA
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • student/parent/teacher conferences
  • teacher websites
  • email communication
  • power school
  • community performances/displays
b.  Correctly spell frequently misspelled words and common homophones.
Demonstrate understanding of the 6 + 1 Traits of Writing by editing for trait #6: conventions.
  • classroom tests
  • classroom quizzes
  • projects
  • common assessments
  • performances/displays/presentations
  • teacher checklists
  • teacher rubrics
  • large scale assessments: NWEA, MEA
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • student/parent/teacher conferences
  • teacher websites
  • email communication
  • power school
  • community performances/displays
E. LISTENING AND SPEAKING:   Students listen to comprehend and speak to communicate effectively.
E.1. Listening  
Students adjust listening strategies to understand formal and informal discussion, debates or presentations and then apply the information.
a.  Ask appropriate clarifying questions.
Adapt and apply reading strategy react and connect to assist in reaching personal interpretation and evaluation of presentation.

Apply teacher created or student created criteria to assist in reaching interpretation and evaluation of presentation.

Respond appropriately with relevant comment, opinion, evaluation, or question to student or teacher presentation; follow-up initial remarks as necessary to clarify understanding.

Presentations

Discussions

Teacher and/or student- generated rubrics
  • classroom tests
  • classroom quizzes
  • projects
  • common assessments
  • performances/displays/presentations
  • teacher checklists
  • teacher rubrics
  • large scale assessments: NWEA, MEA
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • student/parent/teacher conferences
  • teacher websites
  • email communication
  • power school
  • community performances/displays
b.  Summarize and apply information presented.
Summarizes key points of teacher lecture or student presentation
  • classroom tests
  • classroom quizzes
  • projects
  • common assessments
  • performances/displays/presentations
  • teacher checklists
  • teacher rubrics
  • large scale assessments: NWEA, MEA
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • student/parent/teacher conferences
  • teacher websites
  • email communication
  • power school
  • community performances/displays
c.  Acknowledge and build upon the ideas of others.
Routinely contributes to class discussion in content area
  • classroom tests
  • classroom quizzes
  • projects
  • common assessments
  • performances/displays/presentations
  • teacher checklists
  • teacher rubrics
  • large scale assessments: NWEA, MEA
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • student/parent/teacher conferences
  • teacher websites
  • email communication
  • power school
  • community performances/displays
E.2. Speaking  
Students adjust speaking strategies for formal and informal discussions, debates or presentations appropriate to the audience and purpose.
a.  Organize and present information logically.
Develop and deliver presentations using teacher created and/or student created criteria.

Respond to audiences needs during presentation (e.g., clarify and/or illustrate ideas with examples, adjust to levels of engagement, adjust to level of prior knowledge).
  • classroom tests
  • classroom quizzes
  • projects
  • common assessments
  • performances/displays/presentations
  • teacher checklists
  • teacher rubrics
  • large scale assessments: NWEA, MEA
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • student/parent/teacher conferences
  • teacher websites
  • email communication
  • power school
  • community performances/displays
b.  Adjust volume, tone, eye contact, and gestures to suit the audience.
Use teacher created and student created criteria to develop presentations.

Determine appropriate criteria for presentation based on purpose, mode and context.

Rubrics
  • classroom tests
  • classroom quizzes
  • projects
  • common assessments
  • performances/displays/presentations
  • teacher checklists
  • teacher rubrics
  • large scale assessments: NWEA, MEA
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • student/parent/teacher conferences
  • teacher websites
  • email communication
  • power school
  • community performances/displays
c.  Use conventions of Standard American English.
Demonstrate understanding of writing process by self-editing and seeking peer editing for conventions.

Demonstrate understanding of the 6Traits of Writing by editing for trait #6, conventions.
  • classroom tests
  • classroom quizzes
  • projects
  • common assessments
  • performances/displays/presentations
  • teacher checklists
  • teacher rubrics
  • large scale assessments: NWEA, MEA
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • student/parent/teacher conferences
  • teacher websites
  • email communication
  • power school
  • community performances/displays
d.  Seek feedback and revise to improve effectiveness of communication.
Responds to teacher and peer feedback in oral or written form

Understand and apply the 6 + 1 Traits of Writing

Participates in mini-lessons and practice concepts/skills in their writing.

Modeling

Peer and teacher conferences

Variety of mini-lessons

Editing forms/techniques

Editing for focused correction areas

Self, peer, and teacher evaluation using the 6 Traits of Writing rubrics and scoring guides.

Monitoring of progress through self-reflection and/or portfolio
  • classroom tests
  • classroom quizzes
  • projects
  • common assessments
  • performances/displays/presentations
  • teacher checklists
  • teacher rubrics
  • large scale assessments: NWEA, MEA
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • student/parent/teacher conferences
  • teacher websites
  • email communication
  • power school
  • community performances/displays
e.  Select appropriate media, relevant to audience and purpose that support oral, written, and visual communication.
Models an exemplar that is appropriate for the needs of the material.and audience
  • classroom tests
  • classroom quizzes
  • projects
  • common assessments
  • performances/displays/presentations
  • teacher checklists
  • teacher rubrics
  • large scale assessments: NWEA, MEA
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • student/parent/teacher conferences
  • teacher websites
  • email communication
  • power school
  • community performances/displays
F. MEDIA:  Students recognize and can explain the effects that both print and non-print sources have on listeners, viewers, and readers, in order to develop an awareness of the effects that the media have on forming opinions and making decisions.
F.1. Analysis of Media  
Students identify the various purposes, techniques, and/or effects used to communicate auditory, visual, and written information found in different forms of media.
a.  Describe and evaluate the text features of visual and non-visual media.
Apply reading strategies: preview, skim, and scan to identify major organizing components (e.g., titles, headings, sub-headings, thesis, topic sentences, captions, charts, tables, graphs, pictures, summaries, abstracts, etc.) of academic and popular non-fiction texts (e.g., social studies text and magazines).

Introduction/leads, significance, point of view, and thesis

Body paragraphs/subtopics and details

Conclusion/summary of findings, implication of findings, restatement of thesis

Presentation/bold or italics, subheadings, footnotes, visuals

Before/After; Problem/Solution; Cause/Effect
  • classroom tests
  • classroom quizzes
  • projects
  • common assessments
  • performances/displays/presentations
  • teacher checklists
  • teacher rubrics
  • large scale assessments: NWEA, MEA
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • student/parent/teacher conferences
  • teacher websites
  • email communication
  • power school
  • community performances/displays
b. Explain the role of the media in shaping opinions.
Be exposed to concept of propaganda in their study of persuasive mode.

Discuss concept of propaganda in their study of The Wave.
  • classroom tests
  • classroom quizzes
  • projects
  • common assessments
  • performances/displays/presentations
  • teacher checklists
  • teacher rubrics
  • large scale assessments: NWEA, MEA
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • student/parent/teacher conferences
  • teacher websites
  • email communication
  • power school
  • community performances/displays
c.  Note instances of bias, stereotyping, and propaganda.
Discuss concept of propaganda in their study of The Wave.
  • classroom tests
  • classroom quizzes
  • projects
  • common assessments
  • performances/displays/presentations
  • teacher checklists
  • teacher rubrics
  • large scale assessments: NWEA, MEA
  • report cards
  • progress reports
  • student/parent/teacher conferences
  • teacher websites
  • email communication
  • power school
  • community performances/displays

469 U.S. Route 1 York, Maine | Phone: 207-363-3403 | Fax: 207-363-5602 | Contact Us 

Vision
As the tides of the ocean and the strength of the mountain shape our community, the York Schools' commitment to educational excellence and individual achievement shapes the future of each student. 
Mission
The mission of York Schools is to educate, inspire and challenge all learners to be ethical citizens who will make a difference in a changing and complex world.